Etymology
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backhoe (n.)

"excavating equipment consisting of a digging bucket on the end of an articulated arm, typically mounted on the back of a tractor," by 1928, from back (n. or adj.) + hoe (n.).

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backyard (n.)
also back-yard, "plot of ground at the rear of a house," 1650s (perhaps early 15c.), from back (adj.) + yard (n.1).
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backfill (n.)
1900, "material taken from an excavation used to fill a depression," 1900, from back fill (v.), which is attested by 1880; see back (adv.) + fill (v.).
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hatchback 
type of rear door of an automobile, 1970, from hatch (n.) + back (n.).
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backtrack (v.)
also back-track, "retrace one's steps," figuratively by 1896, from literal sense, with reference to hunted foxes; see back (adv.) + track (v.). Related: Backtracked; backtracking.
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backstitch (n.)
also back-stitch, 1610s, from back (adj.) + stitch (n.). So called because each stitch doubles back on the preceding one. As a verb from 1720.
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backstage (n.)

also back-stage, "the area of a theater out of view of the audience," especially in the wings or dressing rooms, 1891; see back (adj.) + stage (n.).

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fullback (n.)
also full-back, 1882 in sports, from full (adj.) + back (n.).
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paperback (n.)

"book with a paper cover," 1899, from paper (n.) + back (n.).

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backside (n.)
"the rear part of anything," c. 1400, from back (adj.) + side (n.). In the specific sense of "rump of an animal, buttocks" it is recorded by c. 1500.
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