Etymology
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Toyota 

Japanese automaker, begun 1930s as a division of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, named for the family name of the founder. There seems to be no one accepted explanation for the change from -d- to -t-.

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revolver (n.)

"revolving firearm," originally and especially a type of pistol able to fire multiple shots without reloading, 1835, agent noun from revolve (v.). So called by U.S. inventor Samuel Colt (1814-1862) for its revolving bored barrel (later models used a revolving chamber cylinder).

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canned (adj.)

1854, "put up in a can," past-participle adjective from can (v.2). In reference to music, "pre-recorded," from 1903 (with an isolated, hypothetical use from 1894).

John Phillip Sousa, the celebrated bandmaster, strongly condemns "canned music," by which he means automatic musical instruments, such as pianos, organs, graphophones, etc. The professor foresees in the distant future none but mechanical singers, mechanical piano-players, mechanical orchestras, etc., factories running night and day turning out automatic music; bandmasters, choir leaders, organists, etc., being compelled to labor otherwise for their living. [The Cambrian, September 1906]
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Parabellum (n.)

proprietary name for a type of automatic firearm, 1904 (Mauser & Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken), from Latin phrase si vis pacem, para bellum, from para, imperative of parare "to prepare" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure") + bellum "war" (see bellicose).

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print-out (n.)

1899, "image reproduced by other means than chemical photographic development," from the verbal phrase print out (by 1884); see print (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "sheet of printed matter produced by a computer or other automatic apparatus" is by 1953.

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override (v.)

Middle English overriden, from Old English oferridan "to ride across, ride through or over," from ofer "over" (see over) + ridan "to ride" (see ride (v.)). Originally literal, of cavalry, etc. Figurative meaning "to set aside arrogantly" is by 1827, from the notion of "to trample down," hence "supersede." The mechanical sense "to suspend automatic operation" is attested from 1946. As a noun in the sense "act or process of suspending automatic operation," from 1946. Related: Overrode; overriding; overridden.

And þanne þeze Frenschmen come prikkyng doun as þei wolde haue ouyr-rydyn alle oure meyne; but God and our archers made hem sone to stomble. [Layamon, from the description of the Battle of Agincourt in "The Brut, or The Chronicles of England"] 
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pistole (n.)

1590s, former Spanish gold coin (not so called in Spanish), from French pistole, from Italian piastola, diminutive of piastra "plate or leaf of metal" (see piaster) and said to be so called for being smaller and thinner than the Crown. Compare earlier pistolet (1550s) "foreign coin," which OED says is from French pistolet "short firearm" (see pistol).

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mechanical (adj.)

early 15c., "of or pertaining to tools and their use," from mechanic (adj.) + -al (1). By 1570s as "of or pertaining to machines and their use." Of persons or human actions, "resembling machines, automatic, lacking spirit or spontaneity," from c. 1600. Scientific sense of "of or pertaining to the material forces of nature acting on inanimate bodies," from 1620s. Related: Mechanically. Mechanical-minded is recorded from 1820.

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phonography (n.)

1701, "the science of sound-signs, representation of vocal sounds," from phono- "sound, voice" + -graphy "writing, recording." From 1840 as "representation of words as they are pronounced," specifically in reference to Pitman's system of shorthand by phonetic writing. By 1861 as "the automatic recording of sounds" by a phonautograph, later "recording or reproduction of sounds by a phonograph" (1880s).

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holster (n.)

"leather case for a pistol," 1660s, probably from Old English heolster, earlier helustr "concealment, hiding place," from Proto-Germanic *hulfti- (source also of Old High German hulft "cover, case, sheath," Old Norse hulstr "case, sheath," Middle Dutch holster, German Halfter "holster"), from PIE root *kel- (1) "to cover, conceal, save." Intermediate forms are wanting, and the modern word could as well be from the Norse or Dutch cognates.

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