Etymology
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Homer 
traditional name of the supposed author of the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey," from Latin Homerus, from Greek Homeros. It is identical to Greek homeros "a hostage," said to also mean in dialects "blind" (the connecting notion is "going with a companion"). But the name also has been otherwise explained.
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commenter (n.)

also, and originally commentor, late 14c., "author, writer of commentaries," from Medieval Latin commentor and Old French commentour, agent nouns; see comment (v.). Form in -er attested from 1630s. From 1889 as "one who makes remarks about actions, opinions, etc."

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grandiosity (n.)

1814, from French grandiosité; see grandiose + -ity.

The author now and then makes a word for his own use, as complicate, for complicated; and, still less fortunately 'grandiosity' (p. 343). [review of Joseph Forsyth's "Remarks on Italy" in Edinburgh Review, January 1814]
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fatwa (n.)
1620s, from Arabic fetwa "a decision given by a mufti," related to fata "to instruct by a legal decision." Popularized in English 1989 when Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran issued a ruling sentencing author Salman Rushdie to death for publishing "The Satanic Verses" (1988). This was lifted 1998.
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compiler (n.)

mid-14c., "a chronicler, one who makes a compilation," from Anglo-French compilour, Old French compileur "author, chronicler," from Latin compilatorem, agent noun from compilare (see compile). Another form of the word current in Middle and early Modern English was compilator "a plagiarist; a compiler" (c. 1400), directly from Latin.

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kludge 
a fanciful, humorous coinage by U.S. author Jackson W. Granholm (1921-2007), "ill-assorted collection of poorly-matching parts, forming a distressing whole" (Granholm's definition), 1962, also as a verb. It persisted in the jargon of computer programmers for quick-and-dirty fixes in code. Related: Kludged; kludgy.
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mithril (n.)

1954, an invented word by English author J.R.R. Tolkien in his Elvish language for a hard, light, precious silver metal. It first appears in "Fellowship of the Ring;" it was not in the original "The Hobbit" (1937), but was added in the revisions in the third edition (1966).

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pseudonym (n.)

"false name," especially a fictitious name assumed by an author to conceal identity, 1828, in part a back-formation from pseudonymous, in part from German pseudonym and French pseudonyme (adj.), from Greek pseudōnymos "having a false name, under a false name," from pseudēs "false" (see pseudo-) + onyma, Aeolic dialectal variant of onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

"Possibly a dictionary word" at first [Barnhart]. Fowler calls it "a queer out-of-the-way term for an everyday thing." Properly in reference to made-up names; the name of an actual author or person of reputation affixed to a work he or she did not write is an allonym. An author's actual name affixed to his or her own work is an autonym (1867). Related: Pseudonymity.

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lawman (n.)
1530s, "lawyer," from law (n.) + man (n.). Meaning "law-enforcement officer" is from 1865. Old English had lahmann "an official or declarer of the law, one acquainted with the law and qualified to declare it," a word from Old Norse. There is an Anglo-Latin lagamannus "magistrate" from early 12c., hence the proper name of Layamon, author of the "Brut."
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revelator (n.)

"one who makes known events, deeds, etc., " mid-15c., agent noun from obsolete verb revelate "reveal" (1510s), from Latin revelatus, past participle of revelare (see reveal). "Rare and objectionable" [Century Dictionary]. As a title in the Mormon church, by 1850. John the Revelator for the author of the Biblical book of Revelation is by 1650s.

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