Etymology
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pajamas (n.)

also pajamahs, 1800, pai jamahs "loose trousers tied at the waist," worn by Muslims in India and adopted by Europeans there, especially for nightwear, from Hindi pajama, probably from Persian paejamah, literally "leg clothing," from pae "leg" (from PIE root *ped- "foot") + jamah "clothing, garment." The modern U.S. spelling is by 1845; British spelling tends toward pyjamas.

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outerwear (n.)

"clothing designed to be worn outside other garments," 1921, from outer (adj.) + wear (n.), probably based on underwear.

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duster (n.)

1570s, "dust brush for clothes," agent noun from dust (v.). Meaning "sifter, fine sieve" is from 1660s; that of "light overcoat or wrap worn to keep off dust from clothing" is from 1864.

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rag-bag (n.)

"bag in which scraps of clothing are stored," 1820, from rag (n.1) + bag (n.). Figurative sense of "motley collection" is by 1864.

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pettitoes (n.)

1550s, "the toes or feet of a pig," especially as an article of food," from petit + toes. Sometimes in jocular use, "the human foot."

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chifferobe (n.)

also chifforobe; "article of furniture having drawers as well as space for hanging clothes," 1903, from merger of chiffonier + wardrobe (n.).

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investiture (n.)
late 14c., "ceremony of clothing in the insignia of office," from Medieval Latin investitura "an investing," from past participle stem of Latin investire "to clothe" (see invest). Related: Investive.
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le 
French masc. definite article (including the old neuter), fem. la, from Latin ille "he, that," used in Late Latin and Medieval Latin as the definite article. Cognate with Spanish el. Latin ille "that," illa "by that way, there," replaced Old Latin olle/ollus, perhaps by analogy with iste [de Vaan]; from PIE *hol-no- "that, yonder."
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homespun (adj.)
1590s, "spun at home," from home (n.) + spun. Figurative sense of "plain, homely" is from c. 1600. As a noun, "homemade cloth or clothing," from c. 1600.
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singlet (n.)
"unlined woolen garment," c. 1746, from single (adj.) in clothing sense of "unlined, of one thickness" (late 14c.) + -et, apparently in imitation of doublet.
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