Etymology
Advertisement
Reading 

county town of Berkshire, Old English Readingum (c. 900), "(Settlement of) the family or followers of a man called *Read."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Buckinghamshire 

Old English Buccingahamscir, from Buccingahamme (early 10c.), "River-bend land of the family or followers of a man called Bucca."

Related entries & more 
Stuart 

name of the British royal family from 1603 to 1668; see steward. Attested from 1873 as an attribution for styles from that period.

Related entries & more 
hafla (n.)

in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."

Related entries & more 
Germanic (adj.)

1630s, "of Germany or Germans," from Latin Germanicus, from Germani (see German (n.)). From 1773 as "of the Teutonic race;" from 1842 especially with reference to the language family that includes German, Dutch, English, etc. As a noun, the name of that language family, by 1892, replacing earlier Teutonic. Germanical is attested from 1550s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Battenberg (n.)

type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.

Related entries & more 
Seljuk 

Turkish dynastic family of 11c.-13c., c. 1600 (implied in Selzuccian), from Turkish Seljuq, name of the reputed ancestor of the dynasty.

Related entries & more 
housewarming (n.)

also house-warming, "celebration of the entry of a family into a new home," 1570s, from house (n.) + verbal noun from warm (v.).

Related entries & more 
Twi (n.)

chief language of Ghana in West Africa; also known as Akan, it is in the Niger-Congo language family.

Related entries & more 
Stammbaum (n.)

German, "family tree," especially of languages, 1939, from Stamm "tree, trunk" (see stem (n.)) + Baum "tree" (see beam (n.)).

Related entries & more 

Page 4