Etymology
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harry (v.)

Old English hergian "make war, lay waste, ravage, plunder," the word used in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for what the Vikings did to England, from Proto-Germanic *harjon (source also of Old Frisian urheria "lay waste, ravage, plunder," Old Norse herja "to make a raid, to plunder," Old Saxon and Old High German herion, German verheeren "to destroy, lay waste, devastate"). This is literally "to overrun with an army," from Proto-Germanic *harjan "an armed force" (source also of Old English here, Old Norse herr "crowd, great number; army, troop," Old Saxon and Old Frisian heri, Dutch heir, Old High German har, German Heer, Gothic harjis "a host, army").

The Germanic words come from PIE root *korio- "war" also "war-band, host, army" (source also of Lithuanian karas "war, quarrel," karias "host, army;" Old Church Slavonic kara "strife;" Middle Irish cuire "troop;" Old Persian kara "host, people, army;" Greek koiranos "ruler, leader, commander"). Weakened sense of "worry, goad, harass" is from c. 1400. Related: Harried; harrying.

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walkie-talkie (n.)

1939, popularized in World War II army slang, from walk (v.) + talk (v.).

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Anzac 

1915, acronym of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. First used in reference to the Gallipoli campaign.

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umpteen (adj.)

by 1907, popularized in World War I army slang, from umpty + -teen. Related: Umpteenth.

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press-gang (n.)

"detachment under command of an officer empowered to press men into public service," 1690s, from press (v.2) + gang (n.).

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major-general (n.)

"military officer next in rank below a lieutenant-general," 1640s; see major (n.) + general (n.).

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brigadier (n.)

1670s, "officer in command of a brigade," from French brigadier, from brigade "body of soldiers" (see brigade). Brigadier-general is the fuller form of the title.

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constituency (n.)

"body of constituents," especially "a body of persons voting for an elective officer," 1806, from constituent + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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ARVN (n.)

acronym for Army of the Republic of Vietnam, ground military force of South Vietnam, organized 1955.

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poop (n.3)

"up-to-date information," 1941, in poop sheet, U.S. Army slang, of unknown origin, perhaps from poop (n.2).

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