Etymology
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van (n.1)
"front part of an army or other advancing group," c. 1600, shortening of vanguard.
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non-commissioned (adj.)

of officers in the army, "not having a commission," 1703; see non- + commission (v.).

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umpteen (adj.)
by 1907, popularized in World War I army slang, from umpty + -teen. Related: Umpteenth.
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Anzac 
1915, acronym of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. First used in reference to the Gallipoli campaign.
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coroner (n.)

title of a county or municipal officer with certain duties, mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), corouner, from Anglo-French curuner, from Anglo-Latin custos placitorum coronae (late 12c.), originally the title of the officer with the duty of protecting the private property of the royal family, from Latin corona, literally "crown" (see crown (n.)).

In the Middle English period an elected county or borough officer charged with the supervision of pleas of the Crown and the administration of criminal justice.  The duties of the office gradually narrowed and by 17c. the chief function was to determine the cause of death in cases not obviously natural.

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sbirro (n.)

Italian police officer, 1660s, from Italian, "police officer, constable" (plural sbirri), from Late Latin birrus "red," from Greek pyrros "red," literally "fire-colored," from pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire"). With unetymological prefix (compare Spanish esbirro "henchman, minion," also Italian sbarra "barrier, cross-bar," etc.). Probably so called from the original color of the uniform.

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walkie-talkie (n.)
1939, popularized in World War II army slang, from walk (v.) + talk (v.).
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press-gang (n.)

"detachment under command of an officer empowered to press men into public service," 1690s, from press (v.2) + gang (n.).

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major-general (n.)

"military officer next in rank below a lieutenant-general," 1640s; see major (n.) + general (n.).

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brigadier (n.)
1670s, "officer in command of a brigade," from French brigadier, from brigade "body of soldiers" (see brigade). Brigadier-general is the fuller form of the title.
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