Etymology
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anti-perspirant (adj.)
also antiperspirant, 1935, in advertisements for Nonspi ("The Safe Anti-Perspirant for Fastidious Women"), from anti- + perspire + adjectival suffix -ant. Technically an application preventing or restricting the flow of perspiration, as opposed to a deodorant, which deodorizes only and in no way affects secretion.
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retardant (adj.)

"tending to hinder," 1640s, from retard (v.) + -ant or from Latin retardantem (nominative retardans), present participle of retardare. From 1867 as a noun, "retardant substance, substance that inhibits some phenomenon or process."

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ante- 
word-forming element meaning "before, in front of; previous, existing beforehand; introductory to," from Latin ante (prep., adv.) "before (in place or time), in front of, against," also used in compounds, from PIE *anti- "facing opposite, against," inflected form (locative singular) of root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before."
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antedate (v.)
1580s, "to date before the true time," earlier as noun meaning "a backdating, false early date attached to a document or event" (1570s); from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + date (v.1). Meaning "be of older date than" is from 1660s. Related: Antedated; antedating.
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antecede (v.)
"come before in time, place, or order," early 15c. (implied in anteceding), from Latin antecedere "go before," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + cedere "to yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Anteceded; anteceding.
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pissant (n.)

1660s, "an ant," from first element of pismire (q.v.) + ant. Meaning "contemptible, insignificant person" is from 1903.

[B]y sun-down [the gals] come pourin out of the woods like pissants out of an old log when tother end's afire. ["Dick Harlan's Tennessee Frolic," in collection "A Quarter Race in Kentucky," Philadelphia, 1846]
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avant 
French, literally "before," in various terms borrowed into English; cognate with Italian avanti, both from Late Latin abante, a compound of ab "from" (see ab-) and ante "before, in front of" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") which meant "from in front of," but in Vulgar Latin came to mean simply "before."
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antepenultimate (adj.)

"the last but two," 1730, from antepenult (n.), 1610s, abbreviation of Latin antepænultima (syllaba) "last syllable but two in a word," from fem. of antepænultimus, from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + pænultima, from pæne "almost" (a word of uncertain origin) + ultima "last" (see ultimate).

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consultant (n.)

1690s, "person who consults an oracle," from consult + -ant. In medicine, "physician called in by the attending physician to give consultation in a case," by 1872 (perhaps from French, where it was in use by 1867); general meaning "one qualified to give professional advice" is first attested 1893 in a Sherlock Holmes story. Related: Consultancy (1955).

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ante-partum (adj.)

also antepartum, "occurring or existing before birth," 1908, from Latin phrase ante partum "before birth," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + accusative of partus "a bearing, a bringing forth," from partus, past participle of parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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