Etymology
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yeti (n.)

1937, from Sherpa (Tibetan) yeh-teh "small manlike animal." Compare abominable snowman (under abominable).

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jumart (n.)

fabulous hybrid animal, 1680s, from French jumart, jumare, from Provençal gemerre, gemarre, a word of uncertain origin.

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pheromone (n.)

"chemical released by an animal that causes a specific response when detected by another animal of the same species," but the exact definition is much debated; 1959, coined (by Karlson & Lüscher) from Greek pherein "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children") + ending as in hormone.

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umbles (n.)

"edible inner parts of a deer or other animal," c. 1400, see humble.

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toxin (n.)

"organic poison," especially one produced by bacteria in an animal body, 1886, from toxic + -in (2).

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vicuna (n.)

Peruvian ruminant, c. 1600, from Spanish vicuña, from Quechua (Inca) wikuna, the native name of the animal.

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chordate (adj.)

1885, "pertaining to or characteristic of the Chordata," from Chordata. Also from 1885 as a noun, "a chordate animal."

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political (adj.)

1550s, "of or pertaining to a polity, civil affairs, or government;" from Latin politicus "of citizens or the state" (see politic (adj.)) + -al (1). Meaning "taking sides in party politics" (usually pejorative) is from 1749. Political prisoner first recorded 1860; political science is from 1779 (first attested in Hume). Political animal translates Greek politikon zōon (Aristotle, "Politics," I.ii.9) "an animal intended to live in a city; a social animal":

From these things therefore it is clear that the city-state is a natural growth, and that man is by nature a political animal, and a man that is by nature and not merely by fortune citiless is either low in the scale of humanity or above it ... inasmuch as he is solitary, like an isolated piece at draughts. [Rackham transl.]
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caudal (adj.)

"pertaining to or situated near a tail," 1660s, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of unknown origin, + -al (1).

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pet (adj.)

1580s, of an animal, "fondled and indulged," from pet (n.1). Of a thing, material or immaterial, "favored, favorite," by 1826.

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