Etymology
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pheromone (n.)
"chemical released by an animal that causes a specific response when detected by another animal of the same species," but the exact definition is much debated; 1959, coined (by Karlson & Lüscher) from Greek pherein "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children") + ending as in hormone.
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eft (n.)
Old English efte, efeta "small lizard-like animal," of unknown origin (see newt).
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koala (n.)
Australian marsupial, 1808, from the Aboriginal name of the animal, variously given as koola, kulla, kula.
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mammalian (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the mammals," 1813, from mammal + -ian. As a noun, "an animal of the class Mammalia," from 1835.

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toxin (n.)
"organic poison," especially one produced by bacteria in an animal body, 1886, from toxic + -in (2).
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umbles (n.)
"edible inner parts of a deer or other animal," c. 1400, see humble.
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yeti (n.)
1937, from Sherpa (Tibetan) yeh-teh "small manlike animal." Compare abominable snowman (under abominable).
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jumart (n.)
fabulous hybrid animal, 1680s, from French jumart, jumare, from Provençal gemerre, gemarre, a word of uncertain origin.
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pet (adj.)

1580s, of an animal, "fondled and indulged," from pet (n.1). Of a thing, material or immaterial, "favored, favorite," by 1826.

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caudal (adj.)

"pertaining to or situated near a tail," 1660s, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of unknown origin, + -al (1).

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