Etymology
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antiquarian (n.)
"one who studies or is fond of antiquities, one versed in knowledge of ancient things," c. 1600, with -an + Latin antiquarius "pertaining to antiquity," from antiquus "ancient, aged, venerable" (see antique (adj.)). In later use more specifically "collector of antiquities; dealer in old books, coins, objects of art, etc." As an adjective, "pertaining to antiquaries," from 1771. Compare antiquary.
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anomalous (adj.)

"deviating from a general rule," 1640s, from Late Latin anomalus, from Greek anomalos "uneven, irregular," from an- "not" (see an- (1)) + homalos "even," from homos "same" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with"). Related: Anomalously; anomalousness.

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anosmia (n.)

"loss of sense of smell," 1811, Modern Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + osmē "smell" (Doric odmē), from *odsme, from PIE root *hed- "to smell" (see odor) + abstract noun ending -ia.

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Australian (n.)
1690s, originally in reference to aboriginal inhabitants, from Australia + -an. As an adjective by 1814. Australianism in speech is attested from 1891.
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anaerobic (adj.)

"capable of living without oxygen," 1884 (earlier anaerobian, 1879), from French anaérobie, coined 1863 by French bacteriologist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), from Greek an- "without" (see an- (1)) + aēr "air" (see air (n.1)) + bios "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

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Pennsylvanian 

by 1685 (n.) "a person of Pennsylvania;" by 1698 (adj.) "of or pertaining to Pennsylvania," from Pennsylvania + -an. In reference to a geological system, attested from 1891.

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aneuploidy (n.)

abnormal number of chromosomes, 1934, from adjective aneuploid (1931), Modern Latin, coined 1922 by G. Täckholm from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + euploid, from Greek eu "well, good" (see eu-) + -ploid, from -ploos "fold" (from PIE root *pel- (2) "to fold").

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analgesia (n.)
"absence of pain, incapacity of feeling pain in a part, though tactile sense is preserved," 1706, medical Latin, from Greek analgesia "want of feeling, insensibility," from analgetos "without pain, insensible to pain" (also "unfeeling, ruthless"), from an- "not" (see an- (1)) + algein "to feel pain" (see -algia). An alternative form is analgia.
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anomaly (n.)
Origin and meaning of anomaly

1570s, "unevenness;" 1660s, "deviation from the common rule," from Latin anomalia, from Greek anomalia "inequality," abstract noun from anomalos "uneven, irregular," from an- "not" (see an- (1)) + homalos "even," from homos "same" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with"). From 1722 as "something abnormal or irregular."

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Cantabrigian (adj.)
"pertaining to Cambridge," 1540s, from Medieval Latin Cantabrigia (see Cambridge) + -an. Shortened form Cantab is attested from 1750 as "member or graduate of the University of Cambridge."
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