Etymology
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creepage (n.)

"rate or amount that something creeps," 1881, from creep (v.) + -age.

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minimum (n.)

1660s, "smallest portion into which matter is divisible," a sense now obsolete, from Latin minimum "smallest" (thing), neuter of minimus "smallest, least," superlative of minor "smaller" (from PIE root *mei- (2) "small"). Meaning "smallest amount or degree, least amount attainable" is from 1670s.

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moneyer (n.)

c. 1300, "a money-changer;" early 15c., "one who coins money, a minter," from Old French monier (Modern French monnayeur), from Late Latin monetarius "a mint-master," originally "of a mint," from Latin moneta "mint; coinage" (see money (n.)). 

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inflation (n.)
mid-14c., "swelling caused by gathering of 'wind' in the body; flatulence," also, figuratively, "outbursts of pride," from Latin inflationem (nominative inflatio) "a puffing up, a blowing into; flatulence," noun of action from past participle stem of inflare "blow into, puff up," figuratively "inspire, encourage," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").

Meaning "action of inflating with air or gas" is from c. 1600. Monetary sense of "enlargement of prices" (originally by an increase in the amount of money in circulation) first recorded 1838 in American English.
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mint (n.2)

place where money is coined, early 15c., from Old English mynet "coin, coinage, money" (8c.), from West Germanic *munita (source also of Old Saxon munita, Old Frisian menote, Middle Dutch munte, Old High German munizza, German münze), from Latin moneta "mint" (see money (n.) ). An earlier word for "place where money is coined" was minter (early 12c.). General sense of "a vast sum of money" is from 1650s. Mint-mark, "mark placed upon a coin to indicate the mint where it was struck," is from 1797.

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finance (v.)
late 15c., "to ransom" (obsolete), from finance (n.). Sense of "to manage money" is recorded from 1827; that of "to furnish with money" is from 1866. Related: Financed; financing.
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coinage (n.)

late 14c., "currency, coined money," from Old French coignage, from coignier "to coin," from coing "piece of money: (see coin (n.)). Meaning "act or process of coining money" is from early 15c.; sense "deliberate formation of a new word" is from 1690s, from a general sense of "something invented" (c. 1600).

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overage (n.)

"a surplus amount," by 1910, a banking term, coined from over on model of shortage.

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minimum (adj.)

"of the smallest possible amount or degree, that is the lowest obtainable," 1810, from minimum (n.).

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sprinkling (n.)
mid-15c., "act of sprinkling," verbal noun from sprinkle (v.). Meaning "small amount" is from 1590s.
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