Etymology
Advertisement
tautog (n.)
edible marine fish of the Atlantic coast of North America, 1640s, from Narragansett tautauog, plural of taut. Translated by Roger Williams as "sheep's head."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Audubon 
with reference to birds or pictures of them, from U.S. naturalist John James Audubon (1785-1851), who published "The Birds of America" 1827-38.
Related entries & more 
kit-fox (n.)
small fox of western North America, 1812 (Lewis and Clark), the first element perhaps kit (1560s) the shortened form of kitten (n.), in reference to smallness.
Related entries & more 
quetzal (n.)

magnificent bird of Central America with brilliant plumage, 1827, from Spanish quetzal, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) quetzalli, "tail-feather." The full bird name in Nahuatl was quetzaltototl, with tototl "bird."

Related entries & more 
US 
also U.S., abbreviation of United States, attested from 1834. U.S.A. for "United States of America" is recorded from 1885; before that it generally meant "U.S. Army."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
coyote (n.)

common prairie-wolf of western North America, 1759, American English, from Mexican Spanish coyote, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) coyotl. Noted for its howling at night.

Related entries & more 
Patriot Act 

signed into law Oct. 26, 2001; a contrived acronym for the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001.

Related entries & more 
dewberry (n.)

popular name of a woodland bramble or its fruit, which is black with a bluish dewy bloom, 1570s, from dew + berry. a name variously applied in England and North America.

Related entries & more 
enamour (v.)
chiefly British English form of enamor, but also common in America and given preference of spelling in some American dictionaries; for spelling, see -or. Related: Enamoured.
Related entries & more 
piranha (n.)

also pirana, piraya, "voracious carnivorous fish of tropical America," 1869, from Portuguese piranha, from Tupi (Brazil) pira nya, probably literally "biting-fish," with pira "fish."

Related entries & more 

Page 4