Etymology
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World-Wide Web (n.)

also World Wide Web, 1990. See worldwide + web (n.).

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en masse 

French, literally "in mass" (see mass (n.1)).

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en route 

1779, French, literally "on the way" (see route (n.)).

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drug store (n.)

also drug-store, 1810, American English, "pharmacy, store that sells medications and related products," from drug (n.) + store (n.). Drug-store cowboy is 1925, American English slang, originally someone who dressed like a Westerner but obviously wasn't.

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still life (n.)

1690s, translating Dutch stilleven (17c); see still (adj.) + life (n.).

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en suite 

French, literally "as part of a series or set" (see suite (n.)).

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rat fink (n.)

also ratfink, 1963, teen slang, see rat (n.) + fink (n.). Popularized by, and perhaps coined by, U.S. custom car builder Ed "Big Daddy" Roth (1932-2001), who made a hot-rod comic character of it, supposedly to lampoon Mickey Mouse.

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bon voyage 

1670s, French, "pleasant journey," from bon "good," (see bon) + voyage (see voyage (n.)).

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easy chair (n.)

also easy-chair, one designed especially for comfort, 1707, from easy + chair (n.).

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dog-leg (adj.)

also dogleg, "bent like a dog's hind leg," 1843, earlier dog-legged (1703), which was used originally of a type of staircase which has no well hole and consists of two flights with or without winders. See dog (n.) + leg (n.).

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