Etymology
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Nehemiah 
masc. proper name, Jewish leader under Persian king Artaxerxes, from Hebrew Nehemyah, literally "the Lord comforts."
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dynast (n.)

"hereditary ruler," 1630s, from Late Latin dynastes, from Greek dynastes "ruler, chief, lord, master" (see dynasty).

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Lord's 
cricket grounds in London, named for founder Thomas Lord (1757-1832).
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Beelzebub 
Old English Belzebub, Philistine god worshipped at Ekron (II Kings i.2), from Latin, used in Vulgate for New Testament Greek beelzeboub, from Hebrew ba'al-z'bub "lord of the flies," from ba'al "lord" (see Baal) + z'bhubh "fly." Said to have been worshipped as having the power to drive away troublesome flies. By later Christian writers often taken as another name for "Satan," though Milton made him one of the fallen angels.

Baal being originally a title, it was applied by the Hebrews to neighboring divinities based on their attributes; other examples include Baal-berith "the covenant lord," god of the Shechemites; Baal-peor "lord of the opening," a god of Moab and Midian.
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Elijah 
name of the great Old Testament prophet, from Hebrew Elijjah, literally "the Lord is God." The Greek form is Elias.
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Kelvin 
unit of absolute temperature scale, 1911, in honor of British physicist Sir William Thompson, Lord Kelvin (1824-1907).
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monsieur (n.)

the common title of courtesy in France, equivalent to English mister, 1510s, from French monsieur, from mon sieur "my lord," from sieur "lord," shortened form of seigneur (see monseigneur) It was the historical title for the second son or next younger brother of the king of France.

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slumlord (n.)
also slum-lord, 1899, from slum landlord (1885); see slum (n.) + landlord.
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Zephaniah 
masc. proper name, Biblical ninth of the prophets, from Hebrew Tzephanyah "the Lord has hidden."
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monseigneur (n.)

French title of honor given to princes, bishops, and other dignitaries of the church or court, equivalent to my lord, c. 1600, from French monseigneur (12c.), from mon "my" (from Latin meum) + seigneur "lord," from Latin seniorem, accusative of senior "older" (from PIE root *sen- "old"). Plural messeigneurs.

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