Etymology
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airstrip (n.)

also air-strip, a runway for aircraft, typically one without an air base or airport, 1942, from air (n.1) meaning "aircraft" + strip (n.).

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airship (n.)
also air-ship, 1819, from air (n.1) + ship (n.). From 1888 as a translation of German Luftschiff "motor-driver dirigible."
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airhead (n.)

"empty-headed person," 1972, from air (n.1) + head (n.). Earlier as a term in mining (mid-19c.) and as a military term (1950) based on beach-head.

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aero- 

word-forming element meaning "air, atmosphere; gases," in 20c. use with reference to aircraft or aviation, from Greek aēr (genitive aeros) "air, lower atmosphere" (see air (n.1)).

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airlift (n.)
also air-lift, 1893 as a type of pumping device; 1945 in the sense "transportation of supplies by aircraft," from air (n.1) + lift (n.). As a verb by 1949; popularized in reference to the U.S.-British response to the Soviet blockade of West Berlin. Related: Air-lifted; air-lifting.
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aerodonetics (n.)

science of gliding, 1907, Modern Latin coinage by English engineer Frederick W. Lanchester (1868-1946) from Greek aēr (genitive aeros) "air" (see air (n.1)) + stem of donein "to shake, drive about." Also see -ics.

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plein-air (adj.)
1894, from French phrase en plein air, literally "in the open air." The style developed among French impressionists c. 1870.
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airline (n.)
also air-line, 1813, "beeline, straight line between two points on the earth's surface" (as through the air, rather than over terrain), from air (n.1) + line (n.). From 1853 and in later 19c. especially in reference to railways that ran directly between big cities in the U.S. instead of meandering from town to town in search of stock subscriptions as early railways typically did. Meaning "public aircraft transportation company" is from 1914.
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airport (n.1)

also air port, "facility for commercial air transport," used regularly from 1919 (used once, by Alberto Santos-Dumont, in reference to airships, in 1902), from air (n.1) meaning "aircraft" + port (n.1). First reference is to Bader Field, outside Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S., which opened in 1910. An older word for such a thing was aerodrome.

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aircraft (n.)

1850, air-craft, in the writings of John Wise, originally in reference to balloons, from air (n.1) + craft (n.). An image from boating, as were many early aviation words. Of airplanes from 1907 and since 1930s exclusively of them. Aircraft carrier is attested from 1919, in reference to H.M.S. Hermes, launched September 1919, the first ship built from the hull up as an aircraft carrier.

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