Etymology
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advocate (n.)

mid-14c., "one whose profession is to plead cases in a court of justice," a technical term from Roman law, from Old French avocat "barrister, advocate, spokesman," from Latin advocatus "one called to aid (another); a pleader (on one's behalf), advocate," noun use of past participle of advocare "to call (as witness or adviser), summon, invite; call to aid; invoke," from ad "to" (see ad-) + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Also in Middle English as "one who intercedes for another," and "protector, champion, patron." Feminine forms advocatess, advocatrice were in use in 15c.; advocatrix is from 17c. Old English glossed Latin advocatus with þingere (see thing).

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paean (n.)

"hymn of praise, song of triumph;" in general use, "a loud and joyous song," 1590s, from Latin paean "hymn of deliverance, hymn to a help-giving god," from Greek paian "hymn, chant, hymn to Apollo," from Paian, Paiōn, a name of the god of healing; originally the physician of the gods (in Homer), later merged with Apollo; literally "one who touches" (i.e. "one who heals by a touch"), probably taken from a phrase or word at the beginning of the hymn, from paio "to touch, strike." The notion seems to be either a cry asking for aid in war or other trouble, or a giving thanks for aid received.

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review (v.)

1570s, "re-view, examine or view again," from re- "again" + view (v.). The meaning "look back on, recall by the aid of memory" is from 1751; that of "consider or discuss critically to bring out the excellences and defects" especially in the form of a written essay is from 1781. Related: Reviewed; reviewing.

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ministration (n.)

mid-14c., ministracioun, "the action of ministering or serving, the rendering of personal service or aid," from Old French ministration or directly from Latin ministrationem (nominative ministratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).

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subvention (n.)
early 15c., from Old French subvencion "support, assistance, taxation" (14c.), from Late Latin subventionem (nominative subventio) "assistance," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin subvenire "come to one's aid, assist, reinforce," from sub "up to" (see sub-) + venire "to come," from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."
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refreshment (n.)

late 14c., "provision, provisioning; aid, encouragement; act or fact of refreshing; that which refreshes," originally mental and spiritual, from Old French refreschement (Modern French rafraîchissement), from refreschier "refresh, renew" (see refresh (v.)). Sense of "state of being refreshed" is by late 15c. Refreshments, of food and drink only, is by 1660s.

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ancillary (adj.)
"subservient, subordinate, serving as an aid," 1660s, from Latin ancillaris "relating to maidservants," from ancilla "handmaid," fem. diminutive of anculus "servant," literally "he who bustles about," from root of ambi- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + PIE *kwol-o-, from root *kwel- (1) "revolve, move round."
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conduce (v.)

c. 1400, "to lead, conduct" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin conducere "to lead or bring together, contribute, serve," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Intransitive sense of "aid in or contribute toward a result" is from 1580s.

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subsidiary (adj.)
1540s, from Latin subsidiarius "belonging to a reserve, of a reserve, reserved; serving to assist or supplement," from subsidium "a help, aid, relief, troops in reserve" (see subsidy). As a noun, c. 1600, "subsidiary thing." In Latin the word was used as a noun meaning "the reserve."
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lecanomancy (n.)
"divination by inspection of water in a basin" (or perhaps "by throwing three stones into water in a basin and invoking the aid of a demon"), c. 1600, from Latinized form of Greek lekane "dish-pan" (from lekos "a dish, plate, pan") + -mancy "divination by means of."
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