Etymology
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acreage (n.)
"number of acres in a tract of land," 1795, from acre + -age.
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breakage (n.)
1767, "loss or damage done by breaking;" 1813, "action of breaking;" from break (v.) + -age.
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amperage (n.)
strength of an electric current, 1889, from ampere on model of voltage; see -age.
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wreckage (n.)
1814, "fact of being wrecked," from wreck (v.) + -age. Meaning "remains of a wrecked thing" is from 1832.
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aging (n.)
also ageing, "process of imparting age or the qualities of age to," 1860, verbal noun from age (v.).
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pilferage (n.)

"act or practice of petty theft; that which is stolen," 1620s, from pilfer + -age.

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appendage (n.)
"that which is appended to something as a proper part," 1640s, from append + -age.
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drayage (n.)

1791, "fee for conveyance by dray," from dray + -age. Later also simply "conveyance by dray."

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curettage (n.)

"application of the curette," 1890, probably from French curettage (by 1881); see curette + -age.

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vicarage (n.)
early 15c., "benefice of a vicar," from vicar + -age. Meaning "house or residence of a vicar" is from 1520s.
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