Etymology
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stirring (adj.)
late 15c., replacing sterand, from Old English styrend "in active motion; animated, rousing,"present-participle adjective from stir (v.). Related: Stirringly.
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philanthropist (n.)

"one activated by a philanthropical spirit, one who endeavors to benefit others by active works of benevolence or beneficence," 1731, from philanthropy + -ist. Related: Philanthropism.

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trim (adj.)
c. 1500, "neatly or smartly dressed," probably ultimately from trim (v.) or from related Old English trum "firm, fixed, secure, strong, sound, vigorous, active." Related: Trimly; trimness.
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Shakti (n.)

in Hindu philosophy and theology, "divine power, active dimension of godhead," from Sanskrit saknoti "is able, is strong," which is said to be from PIE root *kak- "to enable, help."

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capsaicin 

active component of chili peppers, 1851, from capsicum, the genus name of the plants from which it is extracted, + chemical suffixes. Capsicine (1816) was an earlier name of an impure form of it.

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operative (adj.)

late 15c., operatif, "active, working," from Old French operatif (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin operativus "creative, formative," from operat-, past-participle stem of operari (see operation). Meaning "producing the intended effect" is from 1590s.

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Tylenol (n.)
introduced 1955 as the name of an elixir for children, trade name originally registered by McNeil Laboratories, Philadelphia, Pa., from elements abstracted from N-acetyl-para-aminophenol, the chemical name of its active compound.
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puy (n.)

"conical volcanic hill," especially those in Auvergne, 1858, from French puy, from Latin podium "a height, balcony," literally "support" (see podium). The volcanoes were active from c. 95,000 to 10,000 years before the present.

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decommission (v.)

"to take (something) out of active service," 1922, originally in reference to warships, from de- + commission (v.) in the nautical sense of "be transferred from the naval yard and placed in the command of an officer." Related: Decommissioned; decommissioning.

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conscious (adj.)
Origin and meaning of conscious

c. 1600, "knowing, privy to" (poetic), from Latin conscius "knowing, aware," from conscire "be (mutually) aware," from assimilated form of com "with," or "thoroughly" (see con-) + scire "to know" (see science). The Latin word probably is a loan-translation of Greek syneidos.

The sense of "knowing or perceiving within oneself, sensible inwardly, aware" is from 1630s, perhaps a shortening of conscious to oneself (1620s). Also compare the Latin sense evolution in conscience. From 1650s as "aware (of a fact)." Sense of "active and awake, endowed with active mental faculties" is from 1837. Related: Consciously.

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