Etymology
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treatise (n.)

early 14c., from Anglo-French tretiz (mid-13c.), contracted from Old French traitis "treatise, account," from traitier "deal with; set forth in speech or writing" (see treat (v.)).

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monograph (n.)

"treatise on a single subject, account or description of a single thing," 1805, from mono- "single" + -graph "something written." Earlier in this sense was monography (1773). Related: Monographic; monographist; monographer (1770).

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geodetic (adj.)

1834, see geodesic. Related: Geodetical; geodetically. A geodetic survey takes account of the curvature of the earth to obtain unity of results. The U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey dates to 1879.

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tab (n.2)

"account, bill, check," 1888, American English colloquial, probably a shortened form of tabulation or of tablet in the sense "a sheet for writing on." Figurative phrase keep a tab on is recorded from 1890.

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epexegesis (n.)

"words added to convey more clearly the meaning intended," 1620s, from Modern Latin, from Greek epexegesis "a detailed account, explanation," from epi "in addition" (see epi-) + exegeisthai "to explain" (see exegesis). Related: Epexegetic; epexegetical.

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tot (v.)

"to reckon up," 1760, from tot (n.) "total of an addition," first recorded 1680s, short for total (n.). Hence, "to mark (an account or a name) with the word 'tot.'"

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accusatory (adj.)

c. 1600, "containing an accusation," from Latin accusatorius "of a prosecutor, relating to prosecution; making a complaint," from accusare "call to account, make complaint against" (see accuse). Related: Accusatorial (1801); accusatorially.

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job (v.)

1660s, "to buy and sell as a broker" (intransitive), from job (n.). Meaning "deal in public stocks on one's own account" is from 1721. Meaning "to cheat, betray" is from 1903; earlier "pervert public service to private advantage" (1732). Related: Jobbed; jobbing.

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apologize (v.)

1590s, "to speak in defense of;" see apology + -ize. The sense of "regretfully acknowledge" is attested by 1725. The Greek equivalent, apologizesthai, meant simply "to give an account." Related: Apologized; apologizing; apologizer.

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explicate (v.)

"give a detailed account of," 1530s, from Latin explicatus, past participle of explicare "unfold, unravel, explain," from ex "out" (see ex-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Related: Explicated; explicating.

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