Etymology
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normally (adv.)

1590s, "regularly, according to general custom" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from normal + -ly (2). Meaning "under ordinary conditions" is by 1838.

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arithmetical (adj.)
"pertaining to or according to the rules of arithemetic," 1540s; see arithmetic + -al (1). In modern use, opposed to geometrical. Related: Arithmetically (late 15c.).
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analogous (adj.)

"corresponding (to some other) in particulars," 1640s, from Latin analogus, from Greek analogos "proportionate, according to due proportion," from ana "throughout; according to" (see ana-) + logos "ratio, proportion," a specialized use (see Logos). Used with to or with.

A term is analogous whose single signification applies with equal propriety to more than one object: as, the leg of the table, the leg of the animal. [William Flemming, "The Vocabulary of Philosophy," 1858]
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Cimmerian (adj.)
late 16c., "pertaining to the Cimmerii," an ancient nomadic people who, according to Herodotus, inhabited the region around the Crimea, and who, according to Assyrian sources, overran Asia Minor 7c. B.C.E.; from Latin Cimmerius, from Greek Kimmerios. Homer described their land as a place of perpetual mist and darkness beyond the ocean, but whether he had in mind the same people Herodotus did, or any real place, is unclear.
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litterbug (n.)
1947, from litter + bug (n.). According to Mario Pei ("The Story of Language," Lippincott, 1949) "coined by the New York subways on the analogy of 'jitterbug' ...."
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approval (n.)
"commendation, sanction," 1680s, from approve + -al (2). According to OED, "Rare bef. 1800; now generally used instead of" approvance (1590s, from French aprovance).
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Pismo Beach 

place in California; according to Bright, the name is Obsipeño (Chumashan) /pismu'/ "tar, asphalt," literally "the dark stuff," from /piso'/ "to be black, dark."

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Quechua (n.)

native people of Peru and surrounding regions, 1811, from Spanish, according to OED from Quechua (Inca) kechua "plunderer, destroyer." Also the name of their language. Related: Quechuan.

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jewfish (n.)
1670s, from Jew (n.) + fish (n.). A guess at the name from 1690s suggests it is so called for being a "clean" fish according to Levitical laws.
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veracious (adj.)
"habitually disposed to speak truth," 1670s, from Latin verac-, stem of verax "according to truth, truthful," from verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy") + -ous.
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