Etymology
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normally (adv.)

1590s, "regularly, according to general custom" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from normal + -ly (2). Meaning "under ordinary conditions" is by 1838.

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arithmetical (adj.)
"pertaining to or according to the rules of arithemetic," 1540s; see arithmetic + -al (1). In modern use, opposed to geometrical. Related: Arithmetically (late 15c.).
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customary (adj.)

1520s, "liable to customs or dues;" c. 1600, "according to established usage, habitual," from Medieval Latin custumarius, from Latin consuetudinarius, from consuetitudinem (see custom (n.)). In Middle English it was a noun, "written collection of customs" of a manor or community. Earlier words for "according to established usage" were custumal (c. 1400, from Old French), custumable (c. 1300). Related: Customarily.

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litterbug (n.)
1947, from litter + bug (n.). According to Mario Pei ("The Story of Language," Lippincott, 1949) "coined by the New York subways on the analogy of 'jitterbug' ...."
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Quechua (n.)

native people of Peru and surrounding regions, 1811, from Spanish, according to OED from Quechua (Inca) kechua "plunderer, destroyer." Also the name of their language. Related: Quechuan.

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Pismo Beach 

place in California; according to Bright, the name is Obsipeño (Chumashan) /pismu'/ "tar, asphalt," literally "the dark stuff," from /piso'/ "to be black, dark."

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jewfish (n.)
1670s, from Jew (n.) + fish (n.). A guess at the name from 1690s suggests it is so called for being a "clean" fish according to Levitical laws.
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veracious (adj.)
"habitually disposed to speak truth," 1670s, from Latin verac-, stem of verax "according to truth, truthful," from verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy") + -ous.
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mook (n.)

"incompetent or foolish but likeable person," by 1930 (according to Partridge). There was a character Little Mook in a series of children's stories c. 1900.

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Sahara 

great desert of northern Africa, 1610s, from Arabic çahra "desert" (plural çahara), according to Klein, noun use of fem. of the adjective asharu "yellowish red." Related: Saharan.

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