Etymology
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trump (n.1)
"playing card of a suit ranking above others," 1520s, alteration of triumph (n.), which also was the name of a card game.
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oversized (adj.)

"over or above the normal size," 1788, past-participle adjective from oversize "make too large" (1670s), from over- + size (v.).

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double-decker (n.)

1835, of ships, "with two decks above the water line;" 1867, of street vehicles, "with two floors;" see double (adj.) + deck (n.).

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paling (n.)

"fence formed by connecting pointed vertical stakes by horizontal rails above and below," 1550s, from pale (n.).

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strapline (n.)
1960, in typography, "subhead above the main head," from strap (n.) + line (n.). In reference to a woman's undergarments, by 1973.
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superscribe (v.)
"write on the surface" (especially of an envelope), 1590s, from Latin superscribere "write over or above" (see superscript). Related: Superscribed; superscribing.
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superscription (n.)
late 14c., from Latin superscriptionem (nominative superscriptio) "a writing above," noun of action from past participle stem of superscribere (see superscript).
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overvalue (v.)

also over-value, "to value (something) above its true worth," 1590s, from over- + value (v.). Related: Overvalued; overvaluing.

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Hyperion 
a Titan, son of Uranus and Gaea, later identified with Apollo, from Greek, literally "he who looks from above," from hyper "over, beyond" (see hyper-).
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surcoat (n.)
"outer coat," early 14c., from Old French surcote "outer garment," from sur- "on, upon, over, above" (see sur- (1)) + cote (see coat (n.)).
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