Etymology
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defeatism (n.)

"conduct tending to bring about acceptance of (the certainty of) defeat" [OED], 1918; see defeatist.

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gossip (v.)
"to talk idly about the affairs of others," 1620s, from gossip (n.). Related: Gossiped; gossiping.
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circumjacent (adj.)

"bordering on every side," late 15c., from Latin circumiacens, present participle of circumiacere "to border upon, to lie round about, enjoin," from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + iacere "to throw, cast, hurl" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Circumjacence; circumjacency.

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heard 
past tense and past participle of hear, Old English herde. To have heard of "know about" is from 1907.
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rampage (v.)

"rage or storm about," 1715, in Scottish, probably from Middle English verb ramp "rave, rush wildly about" (c. 1300), especially of beasts rearing on their hind legs, as if climbing, from Old French ramper (see ramp (v.), also see rampant). Related: Rampaged; rampaging.

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circumspect (adj.)

"cautious, wary," literally "looking about on all sides," early 15c., from Latin circumspectus "deliberate, guarded, well-considered," past participle of circumspicere "look around, take heed," from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Circumspectly; circumspectness.

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flaneur (n.)

"habitual loafer, idle man about town," 1854, from French flâneur, from flâner "to stroll, loaf, saunter," probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse flana "to wander aimlessly," Norwegian flana, flanta "to gad about"), perhaps from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread." Related: flânerie.

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perambulate (v.)

"walk through, about, or over," 1560s, from Latin perambulatus, past participle of perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Perambulated; perambulating.

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celebrated (adj.)

"much-talked-about, having celebrity, famous," 1660s, past-participle adjective from celebrate (v.).

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divagate (v.)

"wander about, stray from place to place," 1590s, from Latin divagatus, past participle of divagari "to wander about," from assimilated form of dis- "apart, in different directions" (see dis-) + vagari "to wander, ramble," from vagus "strolling, wandering, rambling," figuratively "vacillating, uncertain," a word of unknown origin. Related: Divagated; divagating.

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