Etymology
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No results were found for -latry. Showing results for latin.
afforest (v.)
"convert to forest" (especially for hunting grounds), c. 1500, from Anglo-Latin afforestare, from assimilated form of Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + Medieval Latin forestis (see forest (n.)). Related: Afforestation.
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mitral (adj.)

c. 1600, "resembling a mitre, of or pertaining to a mitre," from French mitral, from Modern Latin mitralis, from Latin mitra (see mitre). The mitral valve of the heart is so called from 1705, from Modern Latin mitrales valvulae.

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ubeity (n.)
"whereness," 1670s, from Modern Latin ubietas, from Latin ubi "where" (see ubi).
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longitudinal (adj.)
late 14c., from Medieval Latin longitudinalis, from Latin longitudo (see longitude).
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inhospitable (adj.)

1560s, from French inhospitable (15c.), from Medieval Latin inhospitabilis (equivalent of Latin inhospitalis), from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Medieval Latin hospitabilis (see hospitable).

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turgor (n.)
1857, from medical Latin turgor, from Latin turgere "to swell" (see turgid).
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zonal (adj.)
1839, from Late Latin zonalis, from Latin zona (see zone (n.)).
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invisibility (n.)
1560s, from Late Latin invisibilitas, from Latin invisibilis "not visible, unseen" (see invisible).
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runcinate (adj.)

1776, "irregularly saw-toothed," from Modern Latin runcinatus, from Latin runcina "a (carpenter's) plane."

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femoral (adj.)
1782, from Medieval Latin femoralis, from stem of Latin femur "thigh" (see femur).
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