Etymology
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Hollander 
"native or inhabitant of Holland," mid-15c., from Holland + -er (1).
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Britisher (n.)
"native or inhabitant of Great Britain," 1829, from British + -er (1).
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kindergartener (n.)
1872, "kindergarten teacher," from kindergarten + -er (1). The German form kindergartner is recorded in American English from 1863. As "kindergarten pupil," attested from 1935.
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choreographer (n.)
1829, from choreography + -er (1). Choreographist (1857) did not thrive. In Greek, a person who trained a chorus was a khorodidaskelikos.
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worser (adj.)
double comparative; see worse + -er (2). Attested from late 15c. and common 16c.-17c. Noun worsers "(one's) inferiors" is from 1580s.
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trouper (n.)
1890, "actor or performer in a troupe," from troupe (n.) + -er (1). Transferred sense of "reliable, uncomplaining person" [OED] is attested by 1942, American English.
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easterner (n.)
1839, American English, from eastern + -er (1). Earlier word was easterling.
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hawker (n.)
"one who hunts with a hawk," Old English hafocere; see hawk (n.) + -er (1). For sense "one who sells or peddles," see hawk (v.1).
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pornographer (n.)

1847, "one who writes of prostitutes or obscene subjects," from pornography + -er (1).

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footer (n.)
c. 1600, "a pedestrian;" 1781, "a kick at football;" 1863, British student slang, "the game of football;" see foot (n.), football, -er.
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