Etymology
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circumcise (v.)

mid-13c., "to cut off the foreskin," from Old French circoncisier "circumcise" (12c., Modern French circoncire) and directly from Latin circumcisus, past participle of circumcidere "to cut round, to cut, trim, prune off," from circum "around" (see circum-) + caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike."). Related: Circumcised; circumcising.

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runoff (n.)

also run-off, "precipitation water drained by streams and rivers," 1887, from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + off (adv.). The meaning "deciding race after a tie" is by 1873; the extended sense in reference to an election between the two who got the most votes in the previous, undecided election is attested by 1910, American English.

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basil (n.)
aromatic shrubby plant, early 15c., from Old French basile (15c., Modern French basilic), from Medieval Latin basilicum, from Greek basilikon (phyton) "royal (plant)," from basileus "king" (see Basil). So called, probably, because it was believed to have been used in making royal perfumes. In Latin, confused with basiliscus (see basilisk) because it was supposed to be an antidote to the basilisk's venom.
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intermissive (adj.)

"not continuous," 1580s, from Latin intermiss-, past-participle stem of intermittere "leave off, leave an interval" (see intermit).

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brushwood (n.)
1630s, "tree branches cut off;" 1732, "thicket of small trees and shrubs," from brush (n.2) + wood (n.).
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a priori 
1710, "from cause to effect," a Latin term in logic from c. 1300, in reference to reasoning from antecedent to consequent, based on causes and first principles, literally "from what comes first," from priori, ablative of prior "first" (see prior (adj.)). Opposed to a posteriori. Since c. 1840, based on Kant, used more loosely for "cognitions which, though they may come to us in experience, have their origin in the nature of the mind, and are independent of experience" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Apriorist; apriorism; aprioristic. The a is the usual form of Latin ab "off, of, away from" before consonants (see ab-).
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exterminator (n.)

c. 1400, "an angel who expels (people from a country)," from Late Latin exterminator, from past-participle stem of Latin exterminare  "drive out, expel, put aside, drive beyond boundaries," also, in Late Latin "destroy" (see exterminate). As a substance for ridding a place of rats, etc., by 1848; as a person whose job it is to do this, by 1938. Old English glossed Latin exterminator with ofdræfere ("off-driver").

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abject (adj.)

c. 1400, "humble, lowly, poor; of low quality; menial," from Latin abiectus "low, crouching; common, mean, contemptible; cast down, dispirited," past participle of abicere "to throw away, cast off; degrade, humble, lower," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + iacere "to throw" (past participle iactus; from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel").

The figurative sense of "downcast, brought low, hopeless," is by 1510s. Also in Middle English "cast off, rejected, expelled, outcast," a sense now obsolete. Abject formerly also was a verb in English, "to cast out, expel; to degrade, humiliate" (15c.-17c.). As a noun, "base or servile person," 1530s. Related: Abjectly; abjectness.

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memorious (adj.)

1590s, "having a good memory," from French memorieux or directly from Medieval Latin memoriosus, from Latin memoria (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). By 1856 (Sir Richard F. Burton, with whom it seems to have been a pet word) as "worthy to be remembered."

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aside (adv.)

c. 1300, "off to one side;" mid-14c., "to or from the side;" late 14c., "away or apart from a normal direction or position, out of the way," from a- (1) "on" + side (n.). The noun sense of "words spoken so as to be (supposed) inaudible" is from 1727. Middle English had asidely "on the side, indirectly" (early 15c.) and asideward "sideways, horizontal" (late 14c.). It was used colloquially as a preposition from 1590s.

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