Etymology
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housekeeper (n.)
mid-15c., "householder," from house (n.) + keeper. A later equivalent of householder. The sense of "female head domestic servant of a house" is from c. 1600 (to keep house, as part of a wife's duty, is from late 14c.). Housekeep (v.) is from 1842 and appears to be a back-formation.
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lupus (n.)
late 14c., used of several diseases that cause ulcerations of the skin, from Medieval Latin lupus, from Latin lupus "wolf" (see wolf (n.)), apparently because it "devours" the affected part. As the name of a southern constellation representing a wolf, by 1706.
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Moira 

fem. proper name, also the name of one of the Fates, from Greek Moira, literally "share, fate," related to moros "fate, destiny, doom," meros "part, lot," meiresthai "to receive one's share" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (2) "to get a share of something").

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palatal (adj.)

1728, of sounds, "uttered by the aid of the palate," from palate + -al (1). By 1786 as "of or pertaining to the roof of the mouth." As a noun, "a sound or letter usually produced by the upper surface of the tongue against a part of the palate," by 1762.

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martyr (v.)

"put to death as punishment for adherence to some religious belief (especially Christianity)," Middle English martiren, from Old French martiriier and in part from Old English gemartyrian, from martyr (n.). Middle English had also a verb martyrize (mid-15c.).

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outskirt (n.)

"outer border, section or part that 'skirts' along the edge or boundary," 1590s, from out- + skirt (n.) in its secondary sense of "edge, border." Now only in plural, outskirts; originally in Spenser, and singular.

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resistless (adj.)

1580s, "irresistible, incapable of being withstood;" 1590s, "unresisting, powerless to resist," from resist (v.) + -less. Related: Resistlessly; resistlessness. Now apparently obsolete in both senses, probably at least in part due to the somewhat conflicting sense.

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laparoscopy (n.)
1855, from -scopy + combining form of Greek lapara "flank, loins, soft part of the body between the ribs and the hips," from laparos "soft, slack, loose," from PIE *lap-aro-, suffixed form of root *lep- (1) "to peel" (see leper). Related: Laparoscopic; laparoscope.
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railing (n.)

late 14c., "the attaching (of a plant, vine, etc.) to a prop or stake;" early 15c., "construction in which rails form an important part," verbal noun from rail (v.2). Technically, railings (late 15c.) are horizontal, palings are vertical.

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scrotum (n.)

"purse-like tegumentary investment of the testes and part of the spermatic cord; the cod" [Century Dictionary], 1590s, from Latin scrotum, which probably is transposed from scortum "a skin, hide" (see corium), perhaps by influence of scrautum "leather quiver for arrows." Related: Scrotal.

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