Etymology
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quandary (n.)

"state of great difficulty or perplexity," 1570s, a word of unknown origin and even the pronunciation is unsettled in old dictionaries (it seems to have been originally accented on the second syllable). Perhaps it is a quasi-Latinism based on Latin quando "when? at what time?; at the time that, inasmuch," pronominal adverb of time, related to qui "who" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns).

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ataraxia (n.)

often Englished as ataraxy, c. 1600, "calmness, impassivity," a term used by stoics and skeptics, from Modern Latin, from Greek ataraxia "impassiveness," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + tarassein (Attic tarattein) "to disturb, confuse," from PIE root *dhrehgh- "to confuse." It seems to have been disused; when ataraxia appeared in print in English in 1858 it was regarded as a neologism.

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*aik- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "be master of, possess." 

It forms all or part of: fraught; freight; ought (v.); owe; own.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit ise, iste "he owns, rules," isvara- "owner, lord, ruler;" Avestan ise, is "ruler over," isti- "property, power;" Old English agan "to have, own."

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interrupt (v.)
c. 1400, "to interfere with a legal right," from Latin interruptus, past participle of interrumpere "break apart, break off, break through," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.), and compare corrupt (adj.)). Meaning "to break into, break in upon, disturb the action of" (especially of speech) is from early 15c. in English (it is also in Latin). Related: Interrupted; interrupting.
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imago (n.)

"final or adult stage of an insect," 1797, from Latin imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). "The name is due to the fact that such an insect, having passed through its larval stages, and having, as it were, cast off its mask or disguise, has become a true representation or image of its species." [Century Dictionary]

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cahoots (n.)
"company, partnership," 1829, Southern and Western American English, of unknown origin; said [OED] to be perhaps from French cahute "cabin, hut" (12c.), but U.S. sources [Bartlett] credit it to French cohorte (see cohort), which is said to have had a sense of "companions, confederates."
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absolutism (n.)

1753 in theology, of God's actions; 1830 in political science, "system of government where the power of the sovereign is unrestricted," in which sense it seems to have been introduced by British reformer and parliamentarian Maj. Gen. Thomas Perronet Thompson. See absolute and -ism.

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Malagasy 

"pertaining to Madagascar," the large island off the southeast coast of Africa, 1835, apparently an alteration of Madagascar (compare French Malgache).

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derailment (n.)

"act of derailing or causing to leave the rails," 1850, from French déraillement, from dérailler "to go off the rails" (see derail).

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apodictic (adj.)
also apodeictic, "clearly demonstrated," 1650s, from Latin apodicticus, from Greek apodeiktikos, from apodeiktos, verbal adjective of apodeiknynai "to show off, demonstrate, show by argument, point out, prove," literally "to point away from" (other objects, at one), from apo "off, away" (see apo-) + deiknynai "to show" (from PIE root *deik- "to show"). Related: Apodictical (1630s); apodictically (1610s).
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