Etymology
Advertisement
Krugerrand (n.)
also Kruger rand, 1967, South African gold coin (issued for investment purposes) bearing a portrait of Transvaal President Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger (1825-1904); second element is rand, unit of decimal currency introduced in Republic of South Africa 1961, named for The Rand, gold-mining area in Transvaal, short for Witwatersrand (see rand).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
canister (n.)
late 15c., "basket," from Latin canistrum "wicker basket" for bread, fruit, flowers, etc., from Greek kanystron "basket made from reed," from kanna (see cane (n.)). It came to mean "small metal receptacle" (1711) through influence of unrelated can (n.). As short for canister shot, it is attested from 1801, so called for its casing.
Related entries & more 
Seneca 

1610s, from Dutch Sennecas, collective name for the Iroquois tribes of what became upper New York, of uncertain origin, perhaps from a Mahican name for the Oneida or their village. Earlier sinnekens, senakees; the form of the English word probably was influenced by the name of the ancient Roman philosopher. The name sometimes was used by Americans for all the Iroquois.

Related entries & more 
cabinet (n.)

1540s, "secret storehouse, treasure chamber; case for valuables," from French cabinet "small room" (16c.), diminutive of Old French cabane "cabin" (see cabin); perhaps influenced by (or rather, from) Italian gabbinetto, diminutive of gabbia, from Latin cavea "stall, stoop, cage, den for animals" (see cave (n.)).

Meaning "case for safe-keeping" (of papers, liquor, etc.) is from 1540s, gradually shading to mean a piece of furniture that does this. Sense of "private room where advisers meet" (c. 1600) led to modern political meaning "an executive council" (1640s); perhaps originally short for cabinet council (1620s); compare board (n.1) in its evolution from place where some group meets to the word for the group that meets there. From 1670s also "building or part of a building set aside for the conservation and study of natural specimens, art, antiquities, etc."

Related entries & more 
playbook (n.)

also play-book, 1530s, "book of stage plays," from play (n.) + book (n.). From 1690s as "book containing material for amusement," especially "a picture book for children." Meaning "book of football plays" recorded from 1965.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Bing (adj.)

in reference to a a dark red type of cherry widely grown in the U.S., 1889, said to have been developed 1870s and named for Ah Bing, Chinese orchard foreman for Oregon fruit-grower Seth Lewelling. 

Related entries & more 
jack-rabbit (n.)
also jackrabbit, large prairie hare, 1863, American English, shortening of jackass-rabbit (1851; see jackass + rabbit (n.)); so called for its long ears. Proverbial for bursts of speed (up to 45 mph).
Related entries & more 
purgery (n.)

"bleaching room for sugar," where it is put to drain off its molasses and imperfections, 1847, from French purgerie (1838), from purger "to wash, clean; refine, purify" (see purge (v.)). For the legal word, see perjury.

Related entries & more 
cosecant (n.)

in trigonometry, 1706, from co, short for complement, + secant.

Related entries & more 
crikey (interj.)

exclamation, 1838, probably one of the many substitutions for Christ.

Related entries & more 

Page 35