Etymology
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solarium (n.)
1891, "part of a house arranged to receive the sun's rays," earlier "sundial" (1842), from Latin solarium "sundial," also "a flat housetop," literally "that which is exposed to the sun," from sol "the sun" (from PIE root *sawel- "the sun").
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dilation (n.)

"act of dilating," 1590s, formed from dilate on the mistaken assumption that the -ate in that word was the Latin verbal suffix (it is instead part of the stem); the proper form, dilatation, is older (c. 1400).

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descender (n.)

1660s, "one who or that which descends," agent noun from descend. Specifically in typography, "part of a letter that extends below the body," 1802. Earlier in this sense was descendant (1670s).

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proportion (v.)

"to adjust or regulate the proportions of; to form according to suitable or harmonious proportions," late 14c., proporciounen, from proportion (n.) and in part from Old French proporcioner and directly from Medieval Latin proportionare. Related: Proportioned; proportioning.

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small (n.)
early 13c., "small person or animal," from small (adj.). From c. 1300 as "persons of low rank" (opposed to great); late 15c. as "the small part" of something (such as small of the back, 1530s).
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outfield (n.)

1630s, "outlying land of a farm" (especially in Scotland), from out- + field (n.); sporting sense is attested from 1851 in cricket, 1868 in baseball, "part of the field most remote from the batsman/batter." Related: Outfielder.

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disunite (v.)

1560s "to separate, cause to be disjoined" (implied in disunited); see dis- + unite. Possibly from Late Latin disunitus, past participle of disunire. Intransitive meaning "to part, fall asunder, become divided" is from 1670s. Related: Disuniting.

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own (v.)

c. 1200, ounen, ahnen, "to possess, have; rule, be in command of, have authority over;" from Old English geagnian, from root agan "to have, to own" (see owe), and in part from the adjective own (q.v.). It became obsolete after c. 1300, but was revived early 17c., in part as a back-formation of owner (mid-14c.), which continued. From c. 1300 as "to acknowledge, concede, admit as a fact," said especially of things to one's disadvantage. To own up "make full confession" is from 1853. Related: Owned; owning.

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utter (v.)
"speak, say," c. 1400, in part from Middle Dutch uteren or Middle Low German utern "to turn out, show, speak," from uter "outer," comparative adjective from ut "out" (see utter (adj.)); in part from Middle English verb outen "to disclose," from Old English utan "to put out," from ut (see out (v.)). Compare German äussern "to utter, express," from aus "out;" and colloquial phrase out with it "speak up!" Formerly also used as a commercial verb (as release is now). Related: Uttered; uttering.
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stump (n.)
"part of a tree trunk left in the ground after felling," mid-15c. (implied from late 13c. in surnames); from mid-14c. as "remaining part of a severed arm or leg;" from or cognate with Middle Low German stump (from adjective meaning "mutilated, blunt, dull"), Middle Dutch stomp "stump," from Proto-Germanic *stamp- (source also of Old Norse stumpr, Old High German stumph, German stumpf "stump," German Stummel "piece cut off"), from PIE *stebh- "post, stem; to support" (see step (v.).
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