Etymology
Advertisement
fez (n.)
1802, from French fez, from Turkish fes, probably ultimately from Fez, the city in Morocco, where this type of tasseled cap was principally made. Made part of the Turkish official dress by sultan Mahmud II.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
merlon (n.)

"solid part of a battlement," between and separating two crenelles or embrasures, 1704, from French merlon (17c.), from Italian merlone, augmentative of merlo "battlement," perhaps [OED] a contraction of mergola, diminutive of Latin mergae "two-pronged pitchfork."

Related entries & more 
nasopharynx (n.)

"part of the pharynx which is behind and above the soft palate, continuous with the nasal passages," 1873, from naso-, combining form of Latin nasus "nose" (from PIE root *nas- "nose") + pharynx. Related: Nasopharyngeal (1860); nasopharyngitis (1879).

Related entries & more 
mercenary (adj.)

"working or acting for reward, serving only for gain," hence "resulting from sordid motives, ready to accept dishonorable gain," 1530s, from mercenary (n.), or in part from Latin mercenarius "hired, paid, serving for pay."

Related entries & more 
anapeiratic (adj.)
in pathology, "arising from too frequent exercise," especially of paralysis of a part caused by repetitive motion, 1877, from Greek anapeirasthai "try again, do again," from ana "again" (see ana-) + pieran "attempt, try" (see pirate (n.)).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
depressor (n.)

"one who or that which depresses or pushes down," 1610s, from Latin depressor, agent noun from deprimere "to press down, depress" (see depress). By 1874 as "surgical instrument for pressing down a part of the body."

Related entries & more 
payload (n.)
also pay-load, by 1914, from pay + load (n.). Originally the part of a truck's (later an aircraft's) load from which revenue is derived (passengers, cargo, mail); figurative sense of "bombs, etc. carried by a plane or missile" is from 1936.
Related entries & more 
periwig (n.)

"peruke, artificial imitation of a head of hair," worn as a fashionable accessory or as part of a professional costume, 1520s, perwyke, a popular corruption of perruck, from French perruque (see peruke), evidently by simulation of the French pronunciation and the influence of peri-.

Related entries & more 
tripartite (adj.)

"divided in three," early 15c., from Latin tripartitus "divided into three parts," from tri- "three" (see three) + partitus, past participle of partiri "to divide" (from pars "a part, piece, a share," from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

Related entries & more 
phonology (n.)

"the science of the sounds uttered by the human voice or used in a particular language, phonetics; that part of grammar which treats of pronunciation; the system of sounds and of their combinations in a language," 1799, from phono- + -logy. Related: Phonologist; phonologic.

Related entries & more 

Page 33