Etymology
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subtrahend (n.)
1670s, from Latin subtrahendus (numerus) "(number) to be subtracted," from gerundive of subtrahere "take away, draw off" (see subtraction).
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masseur (n.)

"man who works giving massages," 1876, from French masseur, masc. agent noun from masser (see massage (n.)). Native massagist (1885), massager (1902) have not displaced it, though the latter is used in purely mechanical and figurative senses.

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spatchcock 

in cookery, denoting a method of grilling a game bird after splitting it open along the spine and laying it flat; a word of obscure origin.

It originated in Ireland in the late eighteenth century as a noun, referring to the bird thus dispatched, and indeed it may have been based on the verb dispatch, with the addition of cock. Another probable influence is the earlier spitchcock, a word of mysterious origin denoting similar treatment meted out to eels and other fish. [Ayto, "Diner's Dictionary"]
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mood (n.2)

"grammatical form indicating the function of a verb," 1570s, an alteration of mode (n.1). The grammatical and musical (1590s) usages of it influenced the meaning of mood (n.1) in such phrases as light-hearted mood, but it is worth remembering that the two moods have no etymological relationship. Also used in traditional logic (1560s) as a variant of mode.

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interruption (n.)
late 14c., "a break of continuity," from Latin interruptionem (nominative interruptio) "a breaking off, interruption, interval," noun of action from past participle stem of interrumpere "to break apart, break off" (see interrupt (v.)). Meaning "a breaking in upon some action" is from c. 1400; that of "a pause, a temporary cessation" is early 15c.
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alectryomancy (n.)

"divination by means of a cock and grains of corn," 1680s, from -mancy "divination" + Latinized form of Greek alektryon "cock," literally "warder-off, fighter," related to alexein "to ward off, drive or keep off" (see Alexander, and compare Alekto, name of one of the three Furies). Perhaps originally a personal name, applied at first to the fighting cock, then to cocks generally. The earlier form of the word in English was alectoromancy (1650s). Letters of the alphabet were traced on the ground and a grain of corn was placed on each.

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love (v.)
Origin and meaning of love

Old English lufian "to feel love for, cherish, show love to; delight in, approve," from Proto-Germanic *lubojanan (source also of Old High German lubon, German lieben), a verb from the root of love (n.). Weakened sense of "like" attested by c. 1200. Intransitive sense "be in love, have a passionate attachment" is from mid-13c. To love (someone) up "make out with" is from 1921. To love and leave is from 1885.

This truth came borne with bier and pall,
I felt it, when I sorrow'd most,
'Tis better to have loved and lost,
Than never to have loved at all —
[Tennyson, "In Memoriam"]
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defalcate (v.)
Origin and meaning of defalcate

1530s, "to lop off, take away or deduct a part of," from Medieval Latin defalcatus, past participle of defalcare, from de "off, away" (see de-) + Latin falx, falcem "sickle, scythe, pruning hook" (see falcate). Modern scientific use dates from 1808.

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sappy (adj.)

Middle English sapi, of a tree or of wood, "full of sap," from Late Old English sæpig, from sæp "sap of a plant" (see sap (n.1)). The colloquial figurative sense, in reference to persons, etc., "foolish, foolishly sentimental" (1660s) might have developed from an intermediate sense of "too wet, sodden, soggy" (late 15c.), or it might have come from sappy as "containing sapwood" (mid-15c.); compare sap (n.2). Or it might be from the notion of "green, juvenile," like a sapling tree. Earlier, now obsolete, figurative senses were "full of vitality" (1550s) and "immature" (1620s). Related: Sappily; sappiness.

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life of Riley (n.)

"life at ease," by 1902 (as Reilly), popularized in U.S. during World War I; it seems to have been military slang initially, sometimes said to trace to various songs but none of that title has been found.

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