Etymology
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Decameron (n.)

c. 1600, from Italian Decamerone, titleof Boccaccio's 14c. collection of 100 tales supposedly told over 10 days, from Greek deka "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten") + hēmera "day," from PIE *Hehmer "day" (source also of Armenian awr "day"). Related: Decameronic.

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decamp (v.)

1670s, "to break camp, depart from a place of encampment" (military), from French décamper (17c.), earlier descamper, from des- (see dis-) + camper (see camp (n.)). Non-military sense of "go away promptly or suddenly" is by 1751. Related: Decamped; decamping.

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decant (v.)

1630s, "pour off gently the clear liquid from a solution by tipping the vessel," originally an alchemical term, from French décanter, perhaps from Medieval Latin decanthare "to pour from the edge of a vessel," from de- "off, away" (see de-) + Medieval Latin canthus "corner, lip of a jug," from Latin cantus, canthus "iron rim around a carriage wheel" (see cant (n.2)). Related: Decanted; decanting.

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decanter (n.)
vessel for decanting liquors, 1715, agent noun from decant.
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decapitalize (v.)

"reduce from the rank or position of a capital city," 1870; see de- + capital (n.1) + -ize. As "to remove the financial capital from," by 1913, from capital (n.2). In reference to letters, "to change from upper case to lower case," by 1899. Related: Decapitalized; decapitalization.

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decapitate (v.)

"behead, cut off the head of," 1610s, from French décapiter (14c.), from Late Latin decapitatus past participle of decapitare, from Latin de "off" (see de-) + caput (genitive capitis) "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). Related: Decapitated; decapitating.

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decapitation (n.)

1640s, "act or fact of decapitating or being decapitated," from French décapitation, from Medieval Latin decapitationem (nominative decapitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin decapitare, from Latin de "off" (see de-) + caput (genitive capitis) "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). In U.S. political slang, "summary removal from office," 1869.

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decapod (n.)

1819, "ten-legged animal, type of crustacean having ten legs" (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), from French décapode (1806), from Modern Latin Decapoda (animalia), from Greek dekapoda, neuter plural of dekapous "ten-footed" (see ten + foot (n.)). From 1885 in reference to a type of locomotive with ten driving-wheels.

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decathlon (n.)

modern composite Olympic event consisting of ten challenges, 1912, from deca- "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten") + Greek athlon "contest, prize," which is of uncertain origin.

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decay (n.)

mid-15c., "deterioration, decline in value, gradual loss of soundness or perfection," from decay (v.). Obsolete or archaic in reference to fortune or property; meaning "decomposition of organic tissue" is from 1590s. In physics, the meaning "gradual decrease in radioactivity" is by 1897.

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