Etymology
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cannibalise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of cannibalize (q.v.); for suffix, see -ize. Related: Cannibalised; cannibalising; cannibalisation.
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cannibalism (n.)
"the eating of human flesh by human beings," 1796, from cannibal + -ism. Perhaps from French cannibalisme, which is attested from the same year.
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cannibalistic (adj.)
"characterized by cannibalism," 1840, from cannibal + -istic. Elder, but swallowed up by the later word, were cannibalic, cannibalish (both from 1824), cannibalean (c. 1600).
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cannibalization (n.)
1907, "the eating of one's own kind," noun of action from cannibalize. As "the makeshift practice of removing working parts from one vehicle or piece of equipment to service another" from 1942, a World War II military term.
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cannibalize (v.)
1798 (in Burke's memoirs), figurative, and meaning "be perverted into cannibalism," from cannibal + -ize. Meaning "take parts from one construction and use them in another" is from 1943, originally of military equipment. Related: Cannibalized; cannibalizing.
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cannoli (n.)

cigar-shaped tubes of fried pastry filled with sweetened ricotta, a Sicilian dessert, 1948, from Italian cannoli, plural of cannola, literally "small tube," from Latin cannula "small reed or pipe," diminutive of canna "reed, pipe" (see cane (n.)).  

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cannon (n.)

c. 1400, "artillery piece, mounted gun for throwing projectiles by force of gunpowder," from Anglo-French canon (mid-14c.), Old French canon (14c.), from Italian cannone "large tube, barrel," augmentative of Latin canna "reed, tube" (see cane (n.)). The double -n- spelling to differentiate it from canon is from c. 1800. Cannon fodder (1847) translates German kanonenfutter (compare Shakespeare's food for powder in "I Hen. IV").

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cannonade (n.)
"a continued discharge of artillery," 1650s, from cannon + -ade. As a verb, "attack with artillery," from 1660s. Compare French canonnade (16c.), Italian cannonata. Related: Cannonaded; cannonading.
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cannon-ball (n.)
also cannon ball, "iron ball to be shot from a cannon," 1660s, from cannon (n.) + ball (n.1). Earlier in this sense was cannon-shot (1590s). As a type of dive, from 1905.
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