Etymology
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bylaw (n.)
also by-law, late 13c., bilage "local ordinance," from Old Norse or Old Danish bi-lagu "town law," from byr "place where people dwell, town, village," from bua "to dwell" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow") + lagu "law" (see law). So, a local law pertaining to local residents, hence "a standing rule of a corporation or association for regulation of its organization and conduct." Sense influenced by by.
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byline (n.)
also by-line, 1926, "line giving the name of the writer of an article in a newspaper or magazine;" it typically reads BY ________. From by (prep.) + line (n.). As a verb by 1942. Related: Bylined.
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by-name (n.)
late 14c., "secondary name;" 1570s, "nickname," from by + name (n.).
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BYOB 
initialism (acronym) for "bring your own bottle" or "bring your own booze," by 1951.
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bypass (v.)
1823, "to pass by" (implied in bypassed), from the verbal phrase; see by + pass (v.). From 1928 as "to go round, avoid;" figurative use from 1941. Related: Bypassed; bypassing.
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bypass (n.)
also by-pass, 1848, "small pipe passing around a valve in a gasworks" (for a pilot light, etc.), from the verbal phrase; see by + pass (v.). First used 1922 for "road for the relief of congestion;" figurative sense is from 1928. The heart operation was first so called 1957.
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by-path (n.)
"side road," late 14c., from by + path.
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by-product (n.)
also byproduct, "secondary or additional product;" 1849, from by + product.
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byre (n.)
"cow-shed, shelter for cattle," Old English byre, perhaps related to bur "cottage, dwelling, house" (see bower).
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by-road (n.)
"side road," 1670s, from by + road.
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