Etymology
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haplography (n.)
"scribal error of writing only once a letter that should have been written twice," 1884; see haplo- + -graphy.
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haploid (adj.)
"having a single set of unpaired chromosomes," 1908, from German haploid (Strasburger, 1905), from Greek haploos "single, simple" (see haplo-) + -oid.
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haplology (n.)

"omission of one occurrence of a sound or syllable that is repeated in a word," 1893; see haplo- + -logy.

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haply (adv.)
"by chance; perhaps," late 14c., hapliche, from hap + -ly (2).
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happen (v.)
late 14c., happenen, "to come to pass, occur, come about, be the case," literally "occur by hap, have the (good or bad) fortune (to do, be, etc.);" extension (with verb-formative -n) of the more common hap (v.). Old English used gelimpan, gesceon, and Middle English also had befall. In Middle English fel it hap meant "it happened." Related: Happened; happening. Phrase happens to be as an assertive way to say "is" is from 1707.
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happening (n.)
mid-15c., "chance, luck," verbal noun from happen (v.); meaning "an occurrence" is 1550s. Sense of "spontaneous event or display" is from 1959 in the argot of artists. Happenings "events" was noted by Fowler as a vogue word from c. 1905.
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happening (adj.)
1520s, "occurring," present-participle adjective from happen (v.). Compare incident.
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happify (v.)
1610s, "to make happy," from happy + -ify. Related: Happified. Enhappy (v.) is attested from 1620s.
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happily (adv.)
mid-14c., "by chance or accident;" late 14c., "by good fortune, luckily," from happy + -ly (2). Sense of "in pleasant circumstances, with mental pleasure and contentment" is from 1510s. Happily ever after recorded by 1825.
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