Etymology
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zep (n.)

abbreviation of zeppelin, attested by 1915.

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abs (n.)

colloquial shortening of abdominals, by 1992.

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role (n.)

c. 1600, "part or character one takes," from French rôle "part played by a person in life," literally "roll" (of paper) on which an actor's part is written, from Old French rolle (see roll (n.)). Not originally in English with direct reference to actors and the stage, but figurative of them. The meaning "any conspicuous function performed characteristically by someone" is by 1875. In the social psychology sense is from 1913. Role model, one taken by others as a model in performance of some role, is attested by 1957.

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moa (n.)

gigantic flightless bird of New Zealand, 1842, a native Maori name. They were hunted to extinction by the Maori by 1500 C.E.

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umma (n.)

"the Islamic community," founded by Muhammad and bound to one another by religious ties and obligations, 1855, from Arabic 'umma "people, community, nation."

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long-headed (adj.)

"discerning," 1700, slang, from long (adj.) + -headed. Literal sense is from 1856. A long head "mind characterized by shrewdness and sagacity" is by 1793.

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telecommuting (n.)

by 1975, as a hypothetical workplace set-up; verbal noun from telecommute. Said to have been coined by Jack Niles of USC.

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busing (n.)

1888, "traveling by omnibus," verbal noun from bus (v.)). From 1965 as "forced integration of schools by transporting children to different areas."

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pacer (n.)

1660s, "a horse whose natural gait is a pace," agent noun from pace (v.). As "one who measures by pacing," by 1835.

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