Etymology
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buck (n.3)

"sawhorse, frame composed of two X-shaped ends joined at the middle by a bar," 1817, American English, apparently from Dutch bok "trestle," literally "buck" (see buck (n.1)). Compare easel.

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gantry (n.)

also gauntree, 1570s, "four-footed stand for a barrel," probably from Old North French gantier (Old French chantier, 13c., "store-room, stock-room"), from Latin cantherius "rafter, frame," also "a gelding," from Greek kanthelios "pack ass," which is related to kanthelion "rafter," of unknown origin. The connecting notion in all this seems to be framework for carrying things. Meaning "frame for a crane, etc." is from 1810. Railway signal sense attested by 1889. Derivation from tree (n.) + gawn "small bucket," an obsolete 16c. contraction of gallon, might be folk-etymology.

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outrigger (n.)

"frame device used in the Pacific and Indian oceans to stabilize canoes," 1748, altered (by influence of rig) from outligger (late 15c.) "a spar projecting from a vessel," probably from the same root as Dutch uitlegger, literally "outlier;" see out- + lie (v.2). 

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predispose (v.)

"incline beforehand, put into a certain frame of mind, render susceptible either mentally or physically," 1640s, perhaps a back-formation from predisposition or else from or based on French predisposer (15c.). Related: Predisposed; predisposing.

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kayak (n.)

type of Eskimo light boat, originally made from seal-skins stretched over a wooden frame, 1757, kajak, from Danish kajak, from Greenland Eskimo qayaq, literally "small boat of skins." The verb is attested from 1875, from the noun. Related: Kayaking; kayaker (1856).

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raising (n.)

mid-14c., "an act of elevating," verbal noun from raise (v.). Specifically in American English, "the erecting of a building," by 1650s.

RAISING. In New England and the Northern States, the operation or work of setting up the frame of a building. [Webster, 1830]
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poy (n.)

"prop, support, pole used to propel a boat," late 15c., a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old French poi, poie, variants of pui, puie "a railing, balustrade, trellis." Poi-tre "frame used to stretch clothes" is attested in English from late 14c.

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salt-box (n.)

also saltbox, 1610s, "receptacle for keeping salt for domestic use," from salt (n.) + box (n.). As a type of frame house with two stories in front, one in back, 1876, so called from resemblance of shape.

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raster (n.)

"scanning field," 1934 in electrical engineering, from German Raster "screen, frame," from Latin rastrum "rake," from rasum, from rodere "to scrape" (see rodent). Related: Rasterization; rasterize. From Latin form rastellum comes French râteau "rake," formerly ratel, originally rastel.

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