Etymology
Advertisement
wayfarer (n.)
mid-15c., agent noun from way (n.) + fare (v.). Earlier was wayferer (late 14c.). The brand of sunglasses (manufactured by Ray-Ban) dates to 1952.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cross-bun (n.)

type of bun indented on top with an X, used especially on Good Friday, 1733, from cross (n.) + bun.

Related entries & more 
skate (n.1)
"type of flat, cartilaginous fish, a kind of ray," mid-14c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse skata "skate," Danish skade, Faeroese skøta, of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
oscilloscope (n.)

"instrument for visually recording an electrical wave," by 1907, a hybrid formed from Latin oscillare "to swing" (see oscillation) + -scope. In reference to the modern cathode-ray oscilloscope, by 1927.

Related entries & more 
manta (n.)

very large ray (also called devilfish), 1760, from Spanish manta "blanket" (which is attested in English from 1748 in this sense, specifically in reference to a type of wrap or cloak worn by Spaniards), from Late Latin mantum "cloak," from Latin mantellum "cloak" (see mantle (n.)). The ray so called "for being broad and long like a quilt" [Jorge Juan and Antonio de Ulloa, "A Voyage to South America"].

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fluoroscopy (n.)
1896, from fluoroscope (1896) "device for observing x-rays by means of action in fluorescent substances," from fluoro- + -scope. Related: Fluoroscopic.
Related entries & more 
crossbones (n.)

also cross-bones, "figure of two thigh-bones laid across each other in the form of an X," 1798, from cross- + bone (n.).

Related entries & more 
cathode (n.)

"negative pole of an electric current," 1834, from Latinized form of Greek kathodos "a way down," from kata "down" (see cata-) + hodos "a way, path, track, road," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus). Proposed by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, and published by English chemist and physicist Michael Faraday. So called from the path the electric current was supposed to take. Related: Cathodic; cathodal. Cathode ray first attested 1880, but the phenomenon known from 1859; cathode ray tube is from 1905.

Related entries & more 
Dolby 

sound reproduction system, 1966, named for its inventor, U.S. engineer Ray M. Dolby (b.1933). The surname probably is a variant of Dalby, from the place in Leicestershire.

Related entries & more 
chiastic (adj.)

"of the nature of a chiasmus," 1856, from Latinized form of Greek khiastos "arranged diagonally; marked with an X" (i.e., resembling the Greek letter chi) + -ic.

Related entries & more 

Page 3