Etymology
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xerasia (n.)
"excessive dryness of hair," 1706, medical Latin, from Greek xerasia "dryness," from xeros "dry, withered," from PIE root *ksero- "dry" (source also of Latin serenus "clear, unclouded," serescere "become dry;" Greek xeron "dry land;" Old High German serawen, German serben "to dry out").
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Xeres 
Andalusian town (modern Jerez) famous for its wine; see sherry. For first letter, see xebec.
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xeric (adj.)

"having little moisture, very dry," 1926; see xero- + -ic.

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xero- 
before vowels, xer-, word-forming element meaning "dry," from Greek xero-, combining form of xeros "dry, withered" (see xerasia).
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xerography (n.)

"photographic reduplication without liquid developers," 1948, from Greek xeros "dry" (see xerasia) + -ography as in photography. Related: Xerographic.

Xerography: Inkless printing and dry photography—named "xerography," from the Greek words for "dry" and "writing"—were recently demonstrated in the United States. Described as "revolutionary" by the New York Times, xerography employs static electricity to record images on special metal plates, and dry powders to reproduce the images on other surfaces. [U.S. Department of State "Air Bulletin," No. 79, vol. 2, Nov. 17, 1948]
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xerophagy (n.)
"habit of living on dry food," especially as a form of fasting, 1650s, from xero- "dry" + -phagy "eating" (see -phagous).
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xerophilous (adj.)
"drought-loving," 1863, from xero- + -philous, from Greek from philos "loving," of uncertain origin.
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xerophyte (n.)
1897, from xero- + Greek phyton "a plant" (see phyto-).
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