Etymology
Advertisement
sensationalist 

1846 in philosophy, "believer or upholder of the doctrine of sensationalism;" 1868 as "a sensational writer or speaker;" from sensational + -ist. Related: Sensationalistic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Runyonesque (adj.)

by 1938 in reference to Damon Runyon (1884-1946), U.S. writer of popular crime stories featuring tough characters and underworld jargon.

Related entries & more 
authorship (n.)

c. 1500, "the function of being a writer," from author (n.) + -ship. The meaning "literary origination, source of something that has an author" is attested by 1808.

Related entries & more 
Chateaubriand (n.)

"grilled beef steak, garnished with herbs," 1877, named, for some reason, for French writer François René, Vicomte de Chateaubriand (1768-1848).

Related entries & more 
Ruy Lopez (n.)

type of chess opening, 1876, from Ruy López de Segura (fl. 1560), Spanish bishop and writer on chess, who developed it.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
satirist (n.)

"writer of satires or satirical compositions," 1580s; see satire (n.) + -ist. The earlier noun was satiric (late 14c.), from Latin satiricus.

Related entries & more 
self-addressed (adj.)

by 1865, "addressed to oneself;" by 1880, of envelopes, "with the address written on it by the intended recipient" (often with stamped); see self- + address (v.).

A self-addressed envelope is one on which is written or printed the writer's address. A letter in which the writer asks for a reply for his own exclusive benefit should enclose a self-addressed envelope. ["Smithdeal's Practical Grammar, Speller and Letter-writer," 1894]
Related entries & more 
genealogist (n.)

"one who traces genealogies, a student of or writer upon genealogy," c. 1600, from genealogy + -ist. A verb genealogize also is recorded from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
playwright (n.)

"writer or adapter of plays for the stage," 1680s (Ben Jonson used it 1610s as a mock-name), from play (n.) + wright (n.).

Related entries & more 
Lucian 

masc. proper name, from Latin Lucianus (source also of French Lucien), a derivative of Roman Lucius, from lux (genitive lucis) "light" (see light (n.)). The Hellenistic Greek writer (c. 160 C.E., his name is Latinized from Greek Loukianos) was noted as the type of a scoffing wit. Hence Lucianist (1580s) in reference to that sort of writer; it also was "the name of two sorts of heretics" [OED].

Related entries & more 

Page 3