Etymology
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suture (n.)
early 15c., "surgical stitching of a wound, etc.," from Latin sutura "a seam, a sewing together," from sutus, past participle of suere "to sew" (from PIE root *syu- "to bind, sew"). Meaning "a seam, a line of joining or closure" is from 1570s.
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welt (n.)
early 15c., a shoemaker's term, perhaps related to Middle English welten "to overturn, roll over" (c. 1300), from Old Norse velta "to roll" (related to welter (v.)). Meaning "ridge on the skin from a wound" is first recorded 1800.
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puttee (n.)

"long strip of cloth wound round the lower leg as protection by soldiers, etc., 1875, patawa (1886 as puttie; modern spelling by 1900), from Hindi patti "band, bandage," from Sanskrit pattah "strip of cloth."

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harrow (v.1)
"to drag a harrow over, break or tear with a harrow," c. 1300, from harrow (n.). In the figurative sense of "wound the feelings, distress greatly" it is first attested c. 1600 in Shakespeare. Related: Harrowed; harrowing.
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bobbin (n.)
"pin or spool around which thread or yarn is wound," 1520s, from French bobine, small instrument used in sewing or tapestry-making, of uncertain origin, perhaps from Latin balbus (see babble (v.)) for the stuttering, stammering noise it made.
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incarnate (v.)
"clothe or embody in flesh," 1530s, a back-formation from incarnation, or else from Late Latin incarnatus "made flesh," past participle of incarnare "to make flesh; be made flesh." Meaning "make or form flesh" (as in healing a wound) is from 1670s. Related: Incarnated; incarnating.
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red (v.)

"make red, redden; become red," Middle English reden, redden, from Old English reodan, readian (past tense read, plural rudon), from the source of red (adj.1). In Old English often "stain with blood, wound, kill."

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sting (n.)
Old English stincg, steng "act of stinging, puncture, thrust," from the root of sting (v.). Meaning "sharp-pointed organ capable of inflicting a painful puncture wound" is from late 14c. Meaning "carefully planned theft or robbery" is attested from 1930; sense of "police undercover entrapment" first attested 1975.
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orifice (n.)

"an opening, a mouth or aperture," early 15c., from Old French orifice "the opening of a wound" (14c.) and directly from Late Latin orificium "an opening," literally "mouth-making," from Latin os (genitive oris) "mouth" (see oral) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Orificial.

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puncture (n.)

late 14c., "small perforation or wound" made by or as if by a pointed instrument, from Late Latin punctura "a pricking," from Latin punctus, past participle of pungere "to prick, pierce" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). The sense of "act of perforating or piercing" is from mid-15c.

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