Etymology
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crossword (adj.)

as the name of a game in which clues suggests words that are written in overlapping horizontal and vertical boxes in a grid, January 1914, from cross (adj.) + word (n.). The first one ran in the "New York World" newspaper Dec. 21, 1913, but was called word-cross. As a noun, 1925, short for crossword puzzle.

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verbatim (adv.)
late 15c., from Medieval Latin verbatim "word for word," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb). As an adjective from 1737.
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logogram (n.)
"word-sign, sign or character representing a word," 1840, from logo- "word" + -gram. Generically, "any symbol representing graphically a product, idea, etc.," from 1966. The earliest use of the word (1820) is in the sense "logograph," but OED explains this as a substitute for logograph, "which in this sense is itself a mistake for logogriph," the old type of word-puzzle.
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broncho- 
before vowels bronch-, word-forming element meaning "bronchus," from Latinized form of Greek bronkhos "windpipe," a word of unknown origin.
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-oholic 
word-forming element abstracted from alcoholic (q.v.); also see -aholic, which has tended to replace it in word formation.
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logo- 
before vowels log-, word-forming element meaning "speech, word," also "reason," from Greek logos "word, discourse; reason," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."
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penultima (n.)

"last syllable but one of a word or verse, a penult," 1580s, from Latin pænultima (syllaba), "the next to the last syllable of a word or verse," from fem. of Latin adjective pænultimus "next-to-last," from pæne "almost" (a word of uncertain origin) + ultimus "final" (see ultimate).

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anyplace (n.)
1911 as one word; two-word form is in Middle English (late 14c.); from any + place (n.).
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noso- 

word-forming element meaning "disease," from Greek nosos "disease, sickness, malady," a word of unknown origin.

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verbicide (n.)
"the killing of a word" by perversion from its original meaning, 1836, from Latin verbum "word" (see verb) + -cide "a killing."
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