Etymology
Advertisement
pipette (n.)

also pipet, "small tube used to withdraw and transfer fluids or gasses from one vessel to another," 1818, from French pipette, originally "tube," diminutive of Old French pipe, from Vulgar Latin *pipa (see pipe (n.1)). In Middle English, pipet is "small musical pipe" (late 15c.; early 14c. as a surname).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
disestablish (v.)

"deprive of the character of being established," 1590s, especially, of a church, "withdraw from exclusive state recognition or privileges" (1832), from dis- + establish. Related: Disestablishment "act of withdrawing (a church) from a privileged relation to the state" (1747; in a non-specific sense, of laws, from 1734); disestablishmentarian (1874).

Related entries & more 
sheer (v.)

1620s, of a ship, "deviate from a line or course," a nautical word of obscure origin, perhaps from Dutch scheren "to move aside, withdraw, depart," originally "to separate" (see shear (v.)). In the general sense of "change one's course" by 1704. Related: Sheered; sheering. As a noun from 1660s.

Related entries & more 
extract (v.)

"to draw out, withdraw, take or get out, pull out or remove from a fixed position, literally or figuratively," late 15c., from Latin extractus, past participle of extrahere "draw out," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)). Related: Extracted; extracting.

Related entries & more 
decease (n.)
Origin and meaning of decease

"death," early 14c., from Old French deces (12c., Modern French décès) "decease, death," from Latin decessus "death" (euphemism for mors), also "a retirement, a departure," from decess-, past participle stem of decedere "die, depart, withdraw," literally "to go down," from de "away" (see de-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Still used with a tinge of euphemism.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
detract (v.)

early 15c., detracten, "disparage, defame, slander," from Latin detractus, past participle of detrahere "to take down, pull down, disparage," from de "down" (see de-) + trahere "to pull" (see tract (n.1)). Literal sense of "take away, withdraw" (c. 1500) is rare in English. Related: Detracted; detracting.

Related entries & more 
repeal (v.)

late 14c., repēlen, "revoke, rescind, annul; withdraw (a privilege, etc.); repudiate (one's behavior)," from Anglo-French repeler (mid-14c.), Old French rapeler "call back, call in, call after, revoke" (Modern French rappeler), from re- "back" (see re-) + apeler "to call" (later appeler; see appeal (v.)). Related: Repealed; repealing; repealable.

Related entries & more 
accede (v.)
Origin and meaning of accede

"come to or arrive at" (a state, position, office, etc.), early 15c., from Latin accedere "approach, go to, come near, enter upon," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + cedere "go, move, withdraw" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Latin ad- usually became ac- before "k" sounds. Related: Acceded; acceding.

Related entries & more 
secessionist (n.)

1860, first in a U.S. context, "one who takes part in or justifies the attempt by the Southern states to withdraw from the union," from secession + -ist. Colloquial short form secesh, noun and adjective, is attested from 1861. The earlier noun had been seceder (1755), but this had religious overtones, especially (with capital s-) in reference to Scottish Church history (see secede). Related: Secessionism.

Related entries & more 
recant (v.)

"to unsay, to contradict or withdraw a declaration or proposition," 1530s, from Latin recantare "recall, revoke," from re- "back" (see re-) + cantare, literally "to chant, to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). The English word is from the Reformation; the Latin verb is a loan-translation of Greek palinoidein "recant," from palin "back" + oeidein "to sing." Related: Recanted; recanting. It was used occasionally 17c. in an etymological sense of "sing over again" (with re- = "again").

Related entries & more 

Page 3