Etymology
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sherry (n.)

kind of white wine, originally from the south of Spain, c. 1600, a mistaken singular from sherris (1530s), from Spanish (vino de) Xeres "(wine from) Xeres," modern Jerez (Roman urbs Caesaris) in Spain, near the port of Cadiz, in the district where the wine was made.

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amontillado (n.)

variety of sherry wine, 1825, from Spanish amontillado, from a "from" (from Latin ad; see ad-) + Montilla, name of a town in the province of Cordova. Formerly the name of a regional wine.

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Chianti (n.)

also Chiante, kind of dry red wine, 1833, from Chianti Mountains of Tuscany, where the wine was made. "[L]oosely applied to various inferior Italian wines" [OED].

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vino (n.)

"inferior wine," 1919, colloquial, from the Italian and Spanish word for "wine," from Latin vinum (see vine (n.)). Earlier (by 1902) as the name of a native drink in the Philippines.

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vappa (n.)

"wine that has lost its flavor," c. 1600, from Latin vappa "wine without flavor," figuratively "a good-for-nothing" (see vapid).

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champagne (n.)

effervescent wine, 1660s, from French, short for vin de Champagne "wine made in Champagne," the former province in northeast France, the name of which is etymologically "open country" (see campaign (n.)). Originally any wine from this region (especially from the vineyards south of Reims), the sense then narrowed to the "sparkling" wines made there (the effervescence is artificially produced), and by late 18c. expanded to effervescent wines made anywhere.

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Edwin 

masc. proper name, from Old English Ead-wine, literally "prosperity-friend, friend of riches," from ead "wealth, prosperity, joy" (see Edith) + wine "friend, protector" (related to winnan "to strive, struggle, fight;" see win (v.)).

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Liebfraumilch (n.)

German white wine, 1833, from German, literally "milk of Our Lady."

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sack (n.4)

"sherry," 1530s, an alteration of French (vin) sec "dry (wine)," from Latin siccus "dry" (see siccative). Originally of strong, light-colored wine from Spain and the Canaries. OED notes that the vowel is "not a normal development from the original 'seck.' "

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Chardonnay (n.)

type of dry white wine, 1907, from French chardonnay, originally the type of grape used to make the wine, supposedly named for the town of Chardonnay, Saône-et-Loire, in eastern France. The name is said to be from Latin Cardonnacum. The wine was enormously popular worldwide in 1990s and early 2000s and the word came to be used as a given name for girls.

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