Etymology
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Jack-o'-lantern (n.)

also jack-o-lantern, jack-a-lantern, jackolantern, 1660s, "night-watchman;" 1670s as a local name for a will-o-the-wisp (Latin ignis fatuus), mainly attested in East Anglia but also in southwestern England. Literally "Jack of (with) the lantern;" see Jack + lantern. The extension to carved pumpkin lanterns is attested by 1834 in American English.

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boar (n.)

Middle English bor, from Old English bar "boar, uncastrated male swine," from Proto-Germanic *bairaz (source also of Old Saxon ber, Dutch beer, Old High German ber "a boar"), which is of unknown origin with no cognates outside West Germanic.

Originally of either wild or tame animals; wild boar is from c. 1200. The chase of the wild boar was considered one of the most exciting sports. Applied by c. 1300 to persons of boar-like character.

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tomboy (n.)

1550s, "rude, boisterous boy," from Tom + boy; meaning "wild, romping girl, girl who acts like a spirited boy" is first recorded 1590s. It also could mean "strumpet, bold or immodest woman" (1570s). Compare tomrig "rude, wild girl." Related: Tomboyish.

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wildly (adv.)

early 15c., from wild (adj.) + -ly (2).

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ferocity (n.)

c. 1600, from French férocité, from Latin ferocitatem (nominative ferocitas) "fierceness," from ferocis, oblique case of ferox "bold, courageous, warlike; fierce, savage, headstrong, cruel," literally "wild-looking," a derivative of ferus "wild" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast") + -ox (genitive -ocis), a suffix meaning "looking or appearing" (cognate with Greek ōps "eye, sight;" from PIE root *okw- "to see").

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fierce (adj.)

mid-13c., "proud, noble, bold, haughty," from Old French fers, fiers, nominative form of fer, fier "strong, overwhelming, violent, fierce, wild; proud, mighty, great, impressive" (Modern French fier "proud, haughty"), from Latin ferus "wild, untamed, uncultivated; waste, desert;" figuratively "wild, uncultivated, savage, cruel" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast").

Meaning "ferocious, wild, savage, cruel" of persons is from c. 1300; of beasts from late 14c. Original English sense of "brave, proud" died out 16c., but while this sense was current fierce often was used in English as an epithet (and thus surname), which accounts for the rare instance of a French word entering English in the nominative case. Related: Fiercely; fierceness. In Middle English sometimes also "dangerous, destructive; great, strong; huge (in number)." An early 15c. medical treatise has fers benes for "wild beans."

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zebra (n.)

c. 1600, from Italian zebra, perhaps via Portuguese, earlier applied to a now-extinct wild ass, of uncertain origin, said to be Congolese [OED], or Amharic [Klein], but perhaps ultimately from Latin equiferus "wild horse," from equus "horse" (see equine) + ferus (see fierce). Related: Zebrine; zebroid.

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yak (n.)

"wild ox of central Asia," 1795, from Tibetan g-yag "male yak." Attested in French from 1791.

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menagerie (n.)

"collection of wild animals kept in captivity," 1712, from French ménagerie "housing for domestic animals, yard or enclosure in which wild animals are kept" (16c.), from Old French manage "household" (see menage).

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onager (n.)

Asiatic wild ass, mid-14c., from Latin onager, from Greek onagros, from onos "ass, she-ass" (related to Latin asinus, but the ultimate source is unknown; see ass (n.1)) + agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field").

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