Etymology
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goshawk (n.)
large type of hawk flown at geese, Old English goshafoc, literally "goose-hawk," from gos "goose" (see goose (n.)) + hafoc "hawk" (see hawk (n.)). Compare Old Norse gashaukr.
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geese (n.)

plural of goose (n.). An instance of i-mutation

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goosebumps (n.)
also goose-bumps, "peculiar tingling of the skin produced by cold, fear, etc.; the sensation described as 'cold water down the back'" [Farmer], 1859, from goose (n.) + bump (n.). So called because the rough condition of the skin during the sensation resembles the skin of a plucked goose. Earlier in the same sense was goose-flesh (1803) and goose-skin (1761; as goose's skin 1744), and earlier still hen-flesh (early 15c.), translating Latin caro gallinacia.
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ferine (adj.)
"wild, in a state of nature," 1630s, from Latin ferinus "pertaining to wild animals," from fera "a wild beast, wild animal" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast").
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feral (adj.)

c. 1600, "wild, undomesticated," from French feral "wild," from Latin fera, in phrase fera bestia "wild animal," from ferus "wild" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast"). Since 19c. commonly "run wild, having escaped from domestication."

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gander (n.)
Old English gandra "male goose," from Proto-Germanic *gan(d)ron (source also of Dutch gander, Middle Low German ganre), from PIE *ghans- "goose" (see goose (n.)). OED suggests perhaps it was originally the name of some other water-bird and cites Lithuanian gandras "stork." Sometimes used 19c. in reference to single men or male-only gatherings (compare stag). Meaning "a long look" is 1912, from gander (v.).
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gannet (n.)
Old English ganot, name of a kind of sea-bird, from Proto-Germanic *ganton- (source also of Dutch gent, Middle High German ganiz, Old High German ganazzo "a gander"), from PIE *ghans- "a goose" (see goose (n.)). Old French gante is from Germanic.
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gosling (n.)
mid-14c. (late 13c. as a surname), from Old Norse gæslingr, from gos "goose" (see goose (n.)) + diminutive suffix (see -ling). replaced Old English gesling. Or the modern word might be a Middle English formation from gos "goose." Similar formation in Danish gæsling, Swedish gäsling, German Gänslein.
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dog-tired (n.)

"as tired as a dog after a long chase," 1806.

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wilderness (n.)
c. 1200, "wild, uninhabited, or uncultivated place," with -ness + Old English wild-deor "wild animal, wild deer;" see wild (adj.) + deer (n.). Similar formation in Dutch wildernis, German Wildernis, though the usual form there is Wildnis.
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