Etymology
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bovver 
1969, Cockney pronunciation of bother "trouble" (q.v.), given wide extended usage in skinhead slang.
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Eurydice 
wife of Orpheus in Greek mythology, from Latinized form of Greek Eurydike, literally "wide justice," from eurys "wide" (see eury-) + dike "custom, usage; justice, right; court case," "custom, usage," and, via the notion of "right as dependent on custom," "law, a right; a judgment; a lawsuit, court case, trial; penalty awarded by a judge," from PIE *dika-, from root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly."
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fess (n.)
wide horizontal band across an escutcheon, late 15c., from Old French faisce, from Latin fascia "a band" (see fasces).
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effuse (adj.)
1520s, from Latin past-participle adjective effusus "poured out," also "extensive, vast, broad, wide" (see effuse (v.)).
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Japheth 

one of the three sons of Noah, from Late Latin Japheth, from Greek Iapheth, from Hebrew Yepheth, perhaps literally "enlargement," from causative form of the stem p-t-h "to be wide, spacious."

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Cinerama (n.)

proprietary name for a form of cinema film projected on a wide, curved screen, 1951, from cinema + -rama. Purists point out that the proper formation would be *Cinorama.

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*ghieh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to yawn, gape, be wide open." 

It forms all or part of: chaos; chasm; dehiscence; gap; gasp; gawp; hiatus; yawn.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit vijihite "to gape, be ajar;" Greek khainein, Latin hiare "to yawn, gape;" Old Church Slavonic zinoti "to open (one's mouth);" Russian razinut', Serbo-Croatian zinuti, Lithuanian žioju, žioti, Czech zivati "to yawn;" Old English ginian, gionian "open the mouth wide, yawn, gape," Old Norse gina "to yawn," Dutch geeuwen, Old High German ginen "to be wide open," German gähnen "to yawn."

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anamorphic (adj.)
1904, in geology in reference to certain metamorphic rocks; see anamorphosis + -ic. Cinematographic use dates from 1954 in reference to lenses to fit wide-screen pictures onto standard screens.
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Broadway 
common street name, c. 1300 as "a wide road or street," from broad (adj.) + way (n.); the allusive use for "New York theater district" is first recorded 1881.
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lax (adj.)
c. 1400, "loose" (in reference to bowels), from Latin laxus "wide, spacious, roomy," figuratively "loose, free, wide" (also used of indulgent rule and low prices), from PIE *lag-so-, suffixed form of root *sleg- "be slack, be languid."

In English, of rules, discipline, etc., from mid-15c. Related: Laxly; laxness. A transposed Vulgar Latin form yielded Old French lasche, French lâche. The laxists, though they formed no avowed school, were nonetheless condemned by Innocent XI in 1679.
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