Etymology
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donee (n.)

"person to whom a gift or donation is made," 1520s, from Old French doné, donné, noun use of past-participle of doner, donner; from Latin donare (see donor + -ee).

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scourge (v.)

c. 1300, scourgen, "to whip, flog" (another, one's self or body, an animal), from Old French escorgier "to whip" and in part from scourge (n.). The figurative meaning "afflict severely, chastise" (often for the sake of punishment or purification) is from late 14c., Biblical. Essentially a doublet of excoriate. Related: Scourged; scourging.

For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth,
And scourgeth every son whom he receiveth.
[Hebrews xii.6, KJV]
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pen-pal (n.)

also pen pal, "friend or contact with whom a regular correspondence is conducted," 1931, from pen (n.1) + pal (n.). gradually replacing earlier pen-friend (1919).

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whereof (adv.)

"of which, of whom," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + of. Similar formation in Swedish hveraf, Danish hvoraf, Dutch waarvan.

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lessee (n.)
"one to whom a lease is given," late 15c., from Anglo-French lesee, Old French lessé, past participle of lesser "to let, to leave" (10c., Modern French laisser), from Latin laxare, from laxus "loose" (see lax).
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donor (n.)

mid-15c., donour, "one who gives or bestows, one who makes a grant," from Anglo-French donour, Old French doneur (Modern French donneur), from Latin donatorem (nominative donator) "giver, donor," agent noun from past participle stem of donare "give as a gift," from donum "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

As "person from whom blood is removed for transfusion," by 1875; in reference to those living or dead from whom organs or tissues are removed for transplantation, by 1918 (originally of guinea pigs).

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fiance (n.)
"man to whom one is betrothed," 1864 (by 1826 as a French word in English), from French fiancé, past participle of fiancer "to betroth" (see fiancee). Borrowed earlier in Middle English as "confidence, trust; word of honor."
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Adrastea 
"nemesis," daughter of Zeus, distributor of rewards and punishments, from Greek Adrasteia, literally "she from whom there is no escape," from adrastos "not running away," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + stem of drasmos "a running away," related to dromos "course" (see dromedary).
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intimate (n.)
1650s, "familiar friend, person with whom one is intimate," from intimate (adj.). Sometimes 17c.-19c. in false Spanish form intimado. Latin intimus had a similar noun sense. Intimates as a commercial euphemism for "women's underwear" is from 1988.
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Seth 
masc. proper name, Biblical third son of Adam, literally "set, appointed," from Hebrew Sheth, from shith "to put, set." The Gnostic sect of Sethites (2c.) believed Christ was a reappearance of Seth, whom they venerated as the first spiritual man.
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